Women Can Be Priests
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2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions!

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Sophie
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 18:46:32 (permalink)
 



Dear friends,

Did you know that Therese of Lisieux, a saint today honoured as one of thirty three Doctors of the Church, longed to be a priest?  Learn more, see here:
with love and blessings,

~Sophie~
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 20:47:26 (permalink)
Dear friends,

Part of the work for women's ordination means labouring for cultural change so as to lift the blinders of prejudice against women from people's vision. One hundred years ago, in both society and in the Church, women had little standing.  As in society, so in the Church -- women were:
  • barred from receiving communion during their monthly periods.
  • After giving birth, it was believed that a women needed to be purified before reentering a Church building. The practice was known as being 'churched' (see: Churching of women.)
  • Women were strictly forbidden to touch sacred objects such as the chalice, the paten or altar linen.
  • Women could not distribute holy communion.
  • In church, women needed to have their heads veiled at all times.
Women were also prohibited from:
  • entering the sanctuary except for the purpose of cleaning it.
  • reading Sacred Scripture from the pulpit.
  • preaching.
  • singing in a church choir.
  • being altar servers.
  • becoming full members of confraternities and organizations of the laity.
The most significant restriction of all  which continues today is that women were barred from receiving the sacrament of Holy Orders -- seven sacraments were open to men, only six for women.

Spurred on by the emancipation of women in secular society, in our own time  we see the institutional prejudice of the Church beginning to crumble. But we are far from the total collapse of this sin. Women are still excluded from ordained ministry. The prejudice is kept alive by Church authorities who cling to flimsy arguments. Quite simply, as people become more informed, the Vatican will not be able to shore up its untenable exclusion of women from priesthood for much longer.

Just as there have been relaxations of what are now recognised as ridiculous prohibitions, eg:

more transformation will come.  In time, it will come to be seen that it was as ridiculous to keep women from presiding at the Eucharist, as it was to keep them from singing in Church or serving at the altar! 

If you have any questions, please let me know!

with love and blessings,

~Sophie~
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 20:56:50 (permalink)
 





Cultural prejudice against women began building up in Catholic community during the first millennium. In the early Middle Ages this became the Church’s institutional prejudice when it was enshrined in Church Law. The beginnings of this we can see in Gratian’s first collection of Church Law (1140 AD).  Rest assured that as we journey together, we will learn more about this.
 
In our own time, spurred on by the emancipation of women in secular society, the institutional prejudice of the Church has begun to crumble. But we are still far from its total collapse. Women are still excluded from the ordained ministries in the Catholic Church.  Compare the shift in official Church laws and learn more, see this document from our library:Most restrictions against women have now been lifted. But the ban against women priests still remains.
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 21:10:32 (permalink)
Dear friends,

Though at first blush to many people the ban against women priests  might seem like nothing more thanan equality or feminist issue.  But it is more than that. In the hearts of Catholic faith, it has always been crucial to determine the true mind of Christ and the genuine meaning of Tradition.

The question as to whether or not women can be ordained must not be decided by social pressure. It must be decided by a careful interpretation of the sources. Important questions for consideration in the case are:
  • Did Jesus himself really exclude women? Was it his intention that women be excluded from priesthood?  What does scripture say?
  • Why were women not ordained in the past?
  • Are there valid theological grounds to bar women from ordination?
The answers to these questions are the ones that should determine the outcome of the debate about women's ordination.  I promise, we will learn more.  If something doesn't makes sense or if you have any questions, please let me know.

with love and blessings,

~Sophie~
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 21:19:12 (permalink)
 





Dear friends,

If you are new to Circles, as we make our way, I will share tidbits of information about tradition, history, theology, Church practice, etc that shed light in some way on the case for women priests.  We'll start out with some information about today's feast day, the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God and as it was formerly known, Feast of the Circumcision.
 
~Sophie~ 
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 21:52:30 (permalink)
 

The Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God
 
The Solemnity of Mary Mother of God commemorates the divine motherhood of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the God-Bearer, Mother of our Lord and God Jesus Christ. It is celebrated on January 1st, one week after Christmas.

In the 4th and 5th centuries debates about the nature of Christ raged in the Church. At issue was the relationship of Christ's divine and human natures. At the center of the debate was a title of Mary. Since at least the 3rd century, Christians referred to her as Theotokos, meaning "God-bearer." The first documented use of this term appears in the writings of Origen of Alexandria in AD 230. Related to theotokos, in popular Christian piety of the time, Mary was called the mother of God. Nestorius, the patriarch of Constantinople from 428-431 objected to this.  He argued that Mary was only the mother of Jesus' human nature and not his divine nature. His ideas (or at least how others perceived his arguments) were condemned at the Council of Ephesus in 431, and again at the Council of Chacedon in 451. The Church decided that Christ was fully God and fully human, and these natures were united in one person, Jesus Christ. Thus Mary could be called "mother of God" since she gave birth to Jesus who was fully divine as well as human. Since then, Mary is honoured as the "mother of God" by Catholics, Orthodox, and many Protestants.

When we celebrate the Solemnity of Mary Mother of God, we honour Mary, chosen among all people throughout history to bear God incarnate, and we honour Jesus Christ, the incarnation -- fully God and fully human. As Christmas honours Christ as the "Prince of Peace," the Solemnity of Mary Mother of God honours Mary as the "Queen of Peace." The solemnity is also designated as the World Day of Peace.

http://www.churchyear.net/motherofgod.html
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 21:52:38 (permalink)
 


Though the origins of a feast celebrating Mary's divine maternity are obscure, there is evidence of ancient feasts commemorating Mary's role as theotokos.

In the Eastern Church, historical records show that in and around 500 AD, the Church celebrated a "Day of the Theotokos" either before or after Christmas. The celebration eventually evolved into a Marian feast on December 26th in the Byzantine calendar and January 16th in the Coptic calendar.

In the Western Church, Christmas has generally been celebrated with an octave -- an eight day extension of the feast. The Gregorian and Roman calendars of the 7th century mark the Christmas octave day with a strong Marian emphasis. Eventually, the eighth day of the octave of Christmas was celebrated as the Feast of the Circumcision of Jesus.

The push for an official feast day celebrating Mary's divine maternity started in Portugal.  In 1751,  Pope Benedict XIV allowed the Portuguese Church to celebrate Mary's divine maternity on the first Sunday in May. The feast was eventually extended to other countries, and by 1914 was celebrated on October 11. The feast of Mary's divine maternity became a universal feast in 1931.

After Vatican II, Pope Paul VI decided to change the feast of Jesus' Circumcision to the Solemnity of Mary Mother of God so as to reclaim the ancient Western Marian emphasis at the end of the Octave of Christmas. Celebrating Mary's divine maternity during the Christmas octave makes sense in that the celebration is connected closely to Christ's birth. Pope Paul VI explained his reasoning for the change as follows:

In the revised arrangement of the Christmas season, we should all turn with one mind to the restored solemnity of the Mother of God. This feast was entered into the calendar in the liturgy of the city of Rome for the first day of January. The purpose of the celebration is to honour the role of Mary in the mystery of salvation and at the same time to sing the praises of the unique dignity thus coming to "the Holy Mother...through whom we have been given the gift of the Author of life." This same solemnity also offers an excellent opportunity to renew the adoration rightfully to be shown to the newborn Prince of Peace, as we once again hear the good tidings of great joy and pray to God, through the intercession of the Queen of Peace, for the priceless gift of peace. Because of these considerations and the fact that the octave of Christmas coincides with a day of hope, New Year's Day, we have assigned to it the observance of the World Day of Peace (Paul VI, Apostolic Exhortation Marialis Cultus, Feb. 2, 1974, no.5).
In this way, Pope Paul VI highlighted the feast's celebration of both Mary and Jesus. He also noted the connection to New Year's Day and Mary's role as Queen of Peace. January 1st, the Solemnity of Mary Mother of God is also the observed "World Day of Peace."

There are many Marian feasts in the Church Calendar. These include The Assumption of Mary, The Immaculate Conception, Our Lady of Sorrows, Our Lady of Guadalupe, Our Lady of Consolation, among many others. However, Mary Mother of God focuses on Mary's divine maternity.

http://www.churchyear.net/motherofgod.html
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 22:11:58 (permalink)
 
 
Pope Benedict XVI Links Women's Equality to Peace
zenit.org
December 12, 2006

VATICAN CITY, DEC. 12, 2006 (Zenit.org).- Benedict XVI warns that peace becomes a mirage when the dignity of woman is not fully respected. The papal warning is included in the message for the World Day of Peace, to be observed Jan. 1. The day's theme, "The Human Person, Heart of Peace," addresses the challenge posed by the equality of nature of all people. 

"Insufficient consideration of the feminine condition also causes factors of instability in the social order," states the message. In particular, the Pope mentions "the exploitation of women treated as objects and in so many ways of lack of respect to their dignity."    In particular, the Holy Father unmasks the persistent conceptions in some cultures "which still assign to woman a role of great submission to the discretion of the man, with consequences offensive to her dignity of person and [the] exercise of the fundamental liberties. One must not fall into the illusion that peace is assured while these forms of discrimination are not also overcome," he notes. Such forms "lacerate the personal dignity inscribed by the Creator in every human being."
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 22:16:09 (permalink)


An excerpt from Pope Benedict XVI's The Human Person, The Heart of Peace, Message for the Celebration of the the 2007 World Day of Peace (emphasis as in Vatican website text):

The natural equality of all persons
 
6. At the origin of many tensions that threaten peace are surely the many unjust inequalities still tragically present in our world. Particularly insidious among these are, on the one hand, inequality in access to essential goods like food, water, shelter, health; on the other hand, there are persistent inequalities between men and women in the exercise of basic human rights.
 
A fundamental element of building peace is the recognition of the essential equality of human persons springing from their common transcendental dignity. Equality on this level is a good belonging to all, inscribed in that natural “grammar” which is deducible from the divine plan of creation; it is a good that cannot be ignored or scorned without causing serious repercussions which put peace at risk. The extremely grave deprivation afflicting many peoples, especially in Africa, lies at the root of violent reactions and thus inflicts a terrible wound on peace.
 
7. Similarly, inadequate consideration for the condition of women helps to create instability in the fabric of society. I think of the exploitation of women who are treated as objects, and of the many ways that a lack of respect is shown for their dignity; I also think —in a different context—of the mindset persisting in some cultures, where women are still firmly subordinated to the arbitrary decisions of men, with grave consequences for their personal dignity and for the exercise of their fundamental freedoms. There can be no illusion of a secure peace until these forms of discrimination are also overcome, since they injure the personal dignity impressed by the Creator upon every human being(5).
 
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 22:25:00 (permalink)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Is the Prohibition of Women Priests a Human Rights Issue?  Click on the link to connect with focused discussion in this dedicated thread.
 
 
 
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 22:39:55 (permalink)
ORIGINAL: Sophie

 

Though the origins of a feast celebrating Mary's divine maternity are obscure, there is evidence of ancient feasts commemorating Mary's role as theotokos.

In the Eastern Church, historical records show that in and around 500 AD, the Church celebrated a "Day of the Theotokos" either before or after Christmas. The celebration eventually evolved into a Marian feast on December 26th in the Byzantine calendar and January 16th in the Coptic calendar.

. . .
 

 
Dear friends,

A Catholic woman priest? As the icon above illustrates, throughout the centuries the faithful have intuitively understood that Mary, a woman, shares in Jesus’ priesthood more than any other person. Historical records document a devotion to her as priest on the part of many saints, popes, bishops, theologians and spiritual authors. Implicit in the devotion is a strong but usually unspoken conviction that though a woman, Mary could easily have been ordained a priest among men. In fact, documentary evidence shows that a certain times in history, this conviction was expressed explicitly in the Church.

Our website founder who now serves as our Academic Advisor, Dr. John Wijngaards' contends that throughout the centuries Catholics have known in their heart of hearts and to the marrow of their bones that women are equal before God and that there is no fundamental justification to bar t them from ordination. As we examine our history as Christ’s believing community, we discover just beneath the surface of cultural opposition to women priests a constant awareness that runs counter to the officially sanctioned social and cultural ideas. One way in which this sensus fidelium -- sense of the faithful -- expressed its conviction is through the age old acceptance of Mary as the most eminent of priests.

In his article The priesthood of Mary, Dr. Wijngaards takes us on a gentle stroll down history's lane. Along the way, he provides an overview of the latent Tradition of Mary as priest. In his conclusion, he shares that:

In our attic of forgotten treasures lies also the ancient conviction that Mary, priest without stain, supports priests in their ministry. Priests used to recommend themselves to her care, and to formulate, before each Mass, the intention of offering the Eucharist through Mary’s immaculate and priestly hands. St. Ignatius of Loyola had a vision in which he saw the Blessed Virgin assisting him especially at the moment of consecration. Priests hailed Mary as their ‘model’, ‘the first priest after Christ’. Have we become too macho to acknowledge a woman as our ‘model priest’? Tradition’s comment is, perhaps, best expressed in a fifteenth-century French painting that shows Mary standing at the altar and wearing priestly vestments, about to distribute Holy Communion. The Pope kneels before her. Should we see any significance in a frowning angel painted next to the Holy Father, who holds his precious tiara?

The link to the article is here: The priesthood of Mary. Please enjoy! If you have any questions, let me know!

with love and blessings,

 
~Sophie~
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 22:52:50 (permalink)
 
Mary's priesthood wasn't something that developed
through time...she was the very first priest and there

right at the beginning of Christ's coming into the world
as a human being.  She truly, truly mediated Christ
presence for us. - womenpriests.org Member Therese

 
Does Tradition show that Mary was priest? Can we find evidence of centuries long devotion to her as a priest? The following document includes a provisional list drawing together the names of saints, bishops, theologians and spiritual authors who have written about Mary’s priesthood and whose writings are, to a limited extent, documented on our web site. Though the list is not intended to reflect the devotion to Mary as Priest in a complete or exhaustive fashion, it does give us an idea as to the continuity and expansiveness of this devotion throughout the ages. The increase in testimonies in later centuries does not come so much from growth in the devotion as it does from the fact that testimonies from earlier times are more difficult to obtain.

Take special note of the sample quotes of the way Mary is described throughout the ages. For example, some of these are drawn from the list:

During his papacy (1903 - 1914) Pope Pius X attached an indulgence to the invocation of Mary as Virgin Priest. Then quite suddenly, during the papacy of Pope Benedict XIV, the Holy Office forbade images of Mary as priest. This was further compounded during the papacy of Pope Pius XI (papacy 1922 - 1939), the Holy Office explicitly forbade any devotion to Mary Virgin Priest.

See the entire list of our research as it stands so far. The link to it is here: http://www.womenpriests.org/mrpriest/mpr_list.asp
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 22:59:00 (permalink)

-The Nativity by He Qi, China
-- Theologian Dr. Tina Beattie: "Maternity, a form of priesthood"

Dear friends,

British theologian Dr. Tina Beattie has a keen interest in Mary.  Beattie's article Mary, the Virgin Priest provides an excellent analysis of the tradition of the Virgin Mother's priesthood.  Beattie examines:
  • Mary's priesthood: The Theology
  • Unexamined instinct
  • Maternity: A Form of Priesthood
  • A Defiling Potency
  • Breaching Taboos
  • Symbolic Reconciliation

Beattie's succinctly observes:


Many see the Catholic Church’s refusal to consider the question of women’s ordination as an almost insurmountable problem. I see it rather as an opportunity and an incentive to develop a coherent theology of women’s priesthood that would not simply absorb women into male hierarchies. The Church’s own symbolism leads along the path of a maternal priesthood. What is it that some men are really afraid of when they contemplate women priests? They have yet to come up with a convincing argument that justifies their fear.
The link to the article is here: http://www.womenpriests.org/mrpriest/beattie.asp.  If you have any questions, as always, please ask!

with love and blessings,

~Sophie~

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

 
Dr. Tina Beattie

Tina Beattie's main areas of teaching and research are in theologies and theories of gender, symbolism and ethics, and in religion and human rights. Her doctoral research was on the theology and symbolism of the Virgin Mary, drawing on the psycholinguistic theory of Luce Irigaray as a resource for the analysis of Christian writings on Mary and Eve in the early Church and in recent Roman Catholic theology. Her thesis formed the basis of her book, God's Mother, Eve's Advocate: A Marian Narrative of Women's Salvation (2002). Her latest book is New Catholic Feminism: Theology And Theory  (Routledge 2006). She is currently beginning new research on the representation of women and religion in human rights discourse.

A copy of a recent cv is found here: http://www.womenpriests.org/circles/fb.asp?m=10104
post edited by Sophie - 2009/01/02 01:13:54
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 23:12:42 (permalink)
 
Virgin of the Inexhaustible Cup 

More information about the tradition of Mary as priest is found here:

post edited by Sophie - 2009/01/02 01:10:51
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 23:23:05 (permalink)
ORIGINAL: Sophie

Dear friends,

If you are new to Circles, as we make our way, I will share tidbits of information about tradition, history, theology, Church practice, etc that shed light in some way on the case for women priests.  We'll start out with some information about today's feast day, the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God and as it was formerly known, Feast of the Circumcision.
 
~Sophie~ 


 
The Feast of the Circumcision of Our Lord is a Christian celebration of the circumcision of Jesus, eight days (according to the Semitic and southern European calculation of intervals of days) after his birth, the occasion too on which the child was formally given his name, Jesus, a name derived from Hebrew meaning "salvation" or "saviour".
 
The circumcision of Jesus is traditionally seen as showing his descent from Abraham.
 
The feast day appears on January 1 in the liturgical calendar of the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches of the Byzantine Rite. It also appears in the pre-1960 General Roman Calendar, and is celebrated by some churches of the Anglican Communion and virtually all Lutheran churches.
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circumcision_of_Christ
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 23:41:17 (permalink)
The great master of light in classical art, Rembrandt von Rijn, accentuates a central theme of light in his painting of the "Presentation in the Temple." Joseph is entirely in the shadows and, while there is light from a window bathing a wall behind them, the light that illuminates Mary, Anna, and Simeon emanates from the Holy Child himself--the Sun of Righteousness.
 
The scripture following that which informs us about Jesus's circumcision tells us about Mary and Joseph presenting the child in the Temple.  This is when the Holy Family present themselves in the Temple to complete the ritual purification of a mother after childbirth and to redeem the firstborn son who by right belongs to God.
 
Saint Luke tells the story (Luke 2,22-40) that introduces the aged and devout Simeon and the apparently even more ancient prophetess Anna.  Like all of Israel, both have waited many years for the Messiah who would redeem them. Mary and Joseph have come simply to fulfill their obligations as faithful Jews. But in this Encounter, or Meeting, as the Orthodox call the Feast, Israel not only recognizes her Messiah but it is revealed to his own people that, as Isaiah prophesied, it is too small a thing for the Saviour to redeem only Israel.  On this day, the glory of the Lord is not hidden in a cloud but seen in the physical presence of the Incarnate God -- a child -- who is to be the Redeemer of the whole world, " a light for revelation to the Gentiles."
 
The Gospel of Luke records:
When eight days were completed for his circumcision, he was named Jesus, the name given him by the angel before he was conceived in the womb. When the days were completed for their purification according to the law of Moses, they took him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord, just as it is written in the law of the Lord, "Every male that opens the womb shall be consecrated to the Lord," and to offer the sacrifice of "a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons," in accordance with the dictate in the law of the Lord.
 
Now there was a man in Jerusalem whose name was Simeon. This man was righteous and devout, awaiting the consolation of Israel, and the holy Spirit was upon him. It had been revealed to him by the holy Spirit that he should not see death before he had seen the Messiah of the Lord. He came in the Spirit into the temple; and when the parents brought in the child Jesus to perform the custom of the law in regard to him,
he took him into his arms and blessed God, saying: "Now, Master, you may let your servant go in peace, according to your word, for my eyes have seen your salvation, which you prepared in sight of all the peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and glory for your people Israel."

The child's father and mother were amazed at what was said about him; and Simeon blessed them and said to Mary his mother, "Behold, this child is destined for the fall and rise of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be contradicted (and you yourself a sword will pierce)
so that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed."
 
There was also a prophetess, Anna, the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher. She was advanced in years, having lived seven years with her husband after her marriage, and then as a widow until she was eighty-four. She never left the temple, but worshiped night and day with fasting and prayer. And coming forward at that very time, she gave thanks to God and spoke about the child to all who were awaiting the redemption of Jerusalem. 
 
When they had fulfilled all the prescriptions of the law of the Lord, they returned to Galilee, to their own town of Nazareth. The child grew and became strong, filled with wisdom; and the favor of God was upon him.
 
Luke 2, 22-40
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 23:51:42 (permalink)
 
Dear friends,

Reflecting back on my childhood and many of my adult years, I remember hearing more about Simeon than I did about Anna.  Considering the story from my current perspective, I two things come to mind:
  • I now understand more clearly the importance of recovering the lost stories of women of the Bible.  They, as much as scriptures male characters, deserve a place in our lives of faith.
  • It is interesting that even at this early stage in Jesus's life, it is a woman -- Anna -- and not a man who is one of the first to begin telling others about Jesus, ie, 'And coming forward at that very time, she gave thanks to God and spoke about the child to all who were awaiting the redemption of Jerusalem.'  Her action calls to mind the same action of the Samaritan Woman and later Mary Magdalene.

Anna -- a woman -- the first Christian evangelist.  As we journey together, we will learn more about the lost now being recovered stories of women of scripture.

with love and blessings,

~Sophie~
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 23:54:53 (permalink)
 
'Anna the Prophetess'
by Louis Glanzman
http://www.louisglanzman.com/annatheprophetess.html 
 
Women of the New Testament 
 
Anna
Prophetess (first century)

"And there was a prophetess, Anna, the daughter of Panuel of the tribe of Asher; she was of a great age, having lived with her husband seven years from her virginity, and as a widow till she was eighty-four. She did not depart from the temple, worshiping with fasting and prayer night and day. And coming up at that very hour she gave thanks to God, and spoke of him to all who were looking for the redemption of Israel. "

- Luke 2:36-38

This short text is all that is recorded of the prophetess Anna, an old Woman who haunted the temple of Jerusalem awaiting some sign of Israel's Redeemer. Her long years of patient vigil were rewarded one day when Mary and Joseph brought their infant son to the temple for his ritual presentation to the Lord. Anna's story follows the longer account of Simeon, an old man who had been assured by the Holy Spirit that he would not die before he had seen the Messiah. When he saw the child Jesus accompanied by his parents, he blessed God and said, "Lord, now lettest thou thy servant depart in peace, according to thy word; for mine eyes have seen thy salvation, which thou hast prepared in the presence of all peoples."

Although no words are attributed to Anna, there is a similar sense of fulfillment in her story. Beyond Jesus' immediate family, she is the first woman to be granted such insight into' the divine mystery concealed in these humble beginnings. And she is the first to proclaim this good news to those like herself - poor and of no account - who lived by faith and waited in hope.
 
Text from Blessed Among All Women: Women Saints, Prophets, And Witnesses For Our Time by Robert Ellsberg (Paperback - April 25, 2007)
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/01 23:56:24 (permalink)
 
The Prophetess Anna
-Rembrandt
 
Anna had been widowed a long time, and living in the great temple of Jerusalem, fasting and praying. When Mary and Joseph brought the infant Jesus to the temple to be presented to the Lord, they were met by Simeon and Anna. Though the writer of the gospel did not record Anna's words, it is written that she "gave thanks to God and spoke about the child to all who were looking forward to the redemption of Jerusalem", thus becoming the first Christian evangelist.
Sophie
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RE: 2009 News Central, Items of Interest, Traffic Directions! 2009/01/02 00:12:09 (permalink)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A fascinating 1996 analysis by Sr. Ruth Fox OSB found a disproportionate number of passages about women have been deleted from the lectionary, a book of biblical passages carefully chosen for church proclamation.
 
The article is well worth the read.  It is available for free download at http://www.futurechurch.org/watw/womeninbibleandlectionary.htm)

 
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