Women Can Be Priests

Holy Women Through the Ages

Page: << < ..678910.. > >> Showing page 10 of 26 - Powered by APG vNext Trial
Author
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/01 02:36:04 (permalink)
0
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dear friend,
 
Good question. I will see if I can find something out and get back to you.
 
~s~
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/01 03:04:59 (permalink)
0
 
 

 
Today September 1 is the feast day of Saint Anna the Prophetess

 

Saint Anna the Prophetess
Rembrandt Harmensz van Rijn, 1631
60 x 48 cm
The Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

The old woman reading in such a thoughtful manner is St Anna the Prophetess. According to the biblical story (Luke 2: 24-28), she was a woman of extreme old age who served God day and night in the Temple.
 
She was present when Joseph and Mary brought their son Jesus to the Temple. St Anna immediately recognised Jesus as the long awaited Messiah.  Rembrandt shows Anna deeply absorbed in studying the Bible. The light comes from behind her, touching on her Oriental-looking headdress stitched with gold thread and her red velvet cloak and shining directly on the Bible and her hand pointing to the Hebrew letters. Rembrandt painted this old woman's hand with great care, with its thin wrinkled skin and clearly visible veins. Anna's face, however, is hidden in shadow.

 
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/01 03:24:45 (permalink)
0


Saint Anna the Prophetess
1st century BC
September 1


Profile: Jewish, the daughter of Phanuel, tribe of Aser. Married at age fourteen; widowed at twenty-one. At age 72 she was charged with the care of the Blessed Virgin Mary at the Temple from her presentation there at age three until her betrothal to Saint Joseph. She was in attendance at the Temple when Jesus was presented. Having all her life believed in the prophecies of the Old Testament, she was the only woman in the Temple to greet Jesus.

Born: 1t century BC

Died: 1st century of natural causes

Name Meaning: gracious one; grace (= Anne)

Canonized: Pre-Congregation
 
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/01 03:37:34 (permalink)
0
'Anna the Prophetess'
feast day September 1



'Anna the Prophetess'
21 3/4"H x 16 3/4"W
Mixed Medium

 
Women of the New Testament
 
"There was also a certain prophetess, Anna by name, daughter of Phanuel of the tribe of Asher. She had seen many days, having lived seven years with her husband after her marriage and then as a widow until she was eighty-four. She was constantly in the temple, worshiping day and night in fasting and prayer. Coming on the scene at this moment, she gave thanks to God and talked about the child to all who looked forward to the deliverance of Jerusalem."

Luke 2:36-38


http://www.louisglanzman.com/annatheprophetess.html
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/01 03:47:48 (permalink)
0

St Anne The Prophetess

 
The daughter of a man named Phanuel, who became a widow at the age of 84. After her husband's death she went to the temple of Jerusalem and prayed and fasted. After a vision she propheted that Jesus was the Messiah.

Eastern rite nameday: February 3
 
www.in2greece.com/english/saints/anna.htm
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/01 04:10:00 (permalink)
0
 
 
 
 
Saint Anna was one of the first prophets to recognize Jesus as the Messiah. She was well known in the temple, and had spent day and night there for 84 years, fasting and praying and waiting for the Christ. She spoke publically in the temple to "all".  She prophesied about him.

Inspired by God, she saw Jesus for who he was. She was open to the signs of the Holy Spirit.

She is a  prophet, a wise and pious woman who interpreted the deep meaning of historical events and of God's message concealed within them. Consequently, she could "give thanks to God" and "[speak of the Child] to all who were looking for the redemption of Jerusalem" (Luke 2:38).

Her long widowhood devoted to worship in the temple, fidelity to weekly fasting and participation in the expectation of those who yearned for the redemption of Israel culminated in her meeting with the Child Jesus.
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/01 05:01:30 (permalink)
0
ORIGINAL: Sophie



Jane Frances de Chantal
1572 - 1641
Feast Day August 18

 

St Jane Frances de Chantal: co-founder of the Order of the Visitation (1572-1641)

A married woman, happily married with four children. Her husband died in a hunting accident. Helped by St Francis de Sales, she founded the Order of the Visitation, adapted for widows and women like herself. Also a friend of St Vincent de Paul.
 
"Sometimes put yourself simply before God, certain of his presence everywhere, and without any effort, whisper very softly to his sacred heart whatever your own heart prompts you to say."

Jeanne de Chantal was born into a wealthy family in Dijon, France. At the age of twenty she married a baron, Christophe de Rabutin. It was a happy marriage, despite the fact that three of their seven children died in infancy. In 1600, however, after eight years of marriage, her husband was killed in a hunting accident. In the following years, as she struggled with her children's upbringing, dependent on her in-laws for support, her heart increasingly turned to the attractions of religious life. She vowed that she would never again marry.

In 1604 she heard a sermon preached by the bishop of Geneva, Francis de Sales. This was a turning point in her life, the beginning of a deep spiritual friendship and partnership that would advance them both along their respective paths to sanctity. Francis was already renowned as a preacher and spiritual director. Rather than present the spiritual life as something fit only for monks and nuns, he tried to present a spirituality accessible to everyone and capable of being lived out in the world. Jeanne immediately responded to his message and asked him to become her spiritual director.
After several years, in 1610, the two of them founded the Order of the Visitation of Mary, a congregation dedicated to prayer and works of charity. Their original intention was that the order would be adapted for widows and other women who, for reasons of health or age, could not endure the rigours of enclosed life. But the plan met with such carping disapproval from ecclesiastical authorities that in the end Jeanne consented to accept enclosure. Jeanne's daughters were married by this time, but her fifteen-year-old son, Celse-Benigne, resisted his mother's plan to enter religious life. He was the occasion of a melodramatic test, for which Jeanne is especially remembered. Laying his body across the threshold of their home, he implored her not to leave. Without hesitation she stepped over him and proceeded on her way.

Jeanne proved a gifted superior, combining superb administrative skills with a profound instinct for the spiritual life. "No matter what happens," she wrote, "be gentle with yourself." In her lifetime the order grew to include eighty communities in several countries. Along the way she encountered persistent criticism from church authorities as well as internal tensions within the congregation. The order attracted many women from an aristocratic background who found it difficult to adapt themselves to the spirit of poverty and obedience. Jeanne weathered these and greater trials, including the death of her son in war and, later, in 1622, the passing of her beloved friend, St. Francis.

She lived on for almost twenty years, dying in 1641 at the age of sixty-nine. Another holy friend, St. Vincent de Paul, was moved to observe: "She was full of faith, and yet all her life long had been tormented by thoughts against it. . . . But for all that suffering her face never lost its serenity, nor did she once relax in the fidelity God asked of her. And so I regard her as one of the holiest souls I have ever met on this earth."








This article first appeared in Blessed among all women: women saints, prophets and witnesses for our time by Robert Ellsberg.  Published by Darton, Longman and Todd Ltd.  www.darton-longman-todd.co.uk
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/01 19:20:21 (permalink)
0
 
 
 
 
 
 
Saint Verena 
Feastday:September 1
3rd century


Hermitess, Originally from Egypt, she was supposedly a relative of St. Victor the Theban Legion. She went to Rhaetia (modern Switzerland) to find him. She settled there at a site called Solothurn, but spent her remaining days as a hermite in a cave near Zurich.
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/01 22:59:28 (permalink)
0
 
 
 
 
 
 
Also honoured on September 1:

Blessed Jane Soderini (Italian, Servite tertiary, d. 1367)
Blessed Juliana of Collalto (Italian, Benedictine abbess, d. 1262)

St. Beatrice da Silva (Portuguese, nun, foundress of Congregation of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary, d. 1490 [canonized 1976]). 
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/01 23:00:09 (permalink)
0
Woman Leader:

Saint Beatrice da Silva Meneses
feast days August 17 and September 1
 



Beatrice was born 1424 in Ceuta, Portugal, daughter of the Count of Biana. She spent most of her life at the royal court of Queen Isabel of Castile in Spain. She became a nun. When she was 60 years old she founded the Congregation of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
 
patronage: prisoners
feast day: August 17
             September 1
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/01 23:16:53 (permalink)
0
Woman Leader, Abbess
 
Hieu of Tadcaster also known as Bega or Bee
Feast days September 2 and 6
 


Saint Bega
7th Century
September 6
Also known as:  Bee

Profile: Irish royalty. Her family arranged her marriage to the Prince of Norway. Bega wanted to devote her life and virginity to the Lord, refused the arrangement, and fled; legend says she was carried across the sea to the coast of Cumberland by riding on a clod of earth.

She lived as an anchoress in Cumberland for many years, being fed by the birds in the woods. Saint Oswald of Northumbria, on a raid to dispel some highwaymen, convinced her to enter a convent for her own safety. She agreed, and took the veil from Saint Aiden of Lindesfarne.

Founded a monastery which later was named after her. Abbess. Known for generosity to the poor and oppressed who came to the abbey for assistance.

Born: 7th century Ireland

Canonized: Pre-Congregation

http://www.stjohn-catholic.org/Saints/09%20-%20September/Month/06%20Saint%20Bega.htm
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/01 23:26:47 (permalink)
0
from News for Medievalists

Nuns who played key roles in helping the nation to get the abbey habit
by Keith Proud
16 May 2007
The Northern Echo
 
IN the story of Christianity in Britain, Hartlepool and Whitby played early pivotal roles, mainly because of an exceptional woman called Hilda.

However, before she began to make her mark on history, another nun called Hieu laid the foundations for her work in the North-East of England.

The link between Hieu and Hilda was the early monastery at Hartlepool. Not as wellchronicled as Hilda, and with confusion even about her actual name, Hieu, reportedly an Irish princess, may even have been the same person as St Bega, St Begu or St Bee.

It was not uncommon for some early chroniclers to use several different names for the same individual (Hilda is often known as Hild), and even to ascribe the words and actions of one person to several different people.

It is remarkable, though, at this vast distance in time from 7th Century Britain, any real facts remain at all, especially since much of what today's historians regard as legend was at the time believed to be the incontrovertible truth.

Hieu was a Celtic Christian who made her way to England where, in about 640AD with the help of St Aidan, she established a monastery for men and women on the headland called Hereteu, now known as the Heugh, at Old Hartlepool.

The Venerable Bede, England's first historian, later called the place Hart's Island.

Not remotely like the later dressed-stone and marble architectural masterpieces of the Middle Ages, these Celtic monasteries were no more than a walled enclosure inside which was a collection of wooden or rough-stone huts with one or two churches. While Hieu was abbess at Hartlepool, spreading the word of Christianity to all who would listen, others were also vigorously pursuing the same course.

Most were priests of the Celtic church who had travelled to Northumbria from Ireland or the Isle of Iona.

Some had arrived in the North as part of the Pope's mission to Britain.

Hilda, born in 614 and a great niece of King Edwin of Northumbria, had been baptised a Christian in 627 by Paulinus, a missionary from Rome, in a small wooden church near where York Minster stands.

TWENTY years later, Hilda had already set off to be with her sister in a convent at Chelles, in France, and may have spent a year there when Bishop Aidan of Lindisfarne asked her to return to Northumbria as a nun.

He gave her a large piece of land at Werhale or "Wyrale", somewhere on the north bank of the River Wear, on which to establish a monastery. Where that was is not now known.

South Shields has been suggested as the site, but it is a long way north of the River Wear.

While she was abbess there, Hilda absorbed the essence of the Celtic church and its monastic beliefs.

In 649, Hieu left her position as abbess of the Hartlepool monastery and Hilda took her place. After she spent some time in charge of the abbey at Tadcaster, Hieu moved to St Bee's, where she founded a new monastery.

Bede wrote at length about Hilda, describing her as a woman of great energy, an inspired teacher and a skilled administrator.

Her wisdom was so renowned that her advice was sought by kings and clerics, but she was at ease with people of all sorts.

Practically nothing is reported of Hilda's time at Hartlepool, and it seems that when her new monastery was established at Whitby in 657, Hartlepool declined as a monastic centre. It was destroyed by marauding Danes in the 9th Century.

The site of the monastery has never been found, but in 1833 a Saxon cemetery was partly uncovered near St Hilda's Church when housing was being built. It seems likely that the remains of the 7th Century monastery could lie beneath the church.

The abbey established by Hilda is described as having been at Streonshalle, which most history books refer to as a pre-Viking name for Whitby.

It seems far more likely that Streonshalle is the original name for Strensall, near York, and a number of eminent historians continue to argue that it was at Strensall and not Whitby that Hilda set up her abbey. Did she set up two at two different times?

However that may be, in 664 she hosted delegates to one of the most significant conferences in the history of England, the Synod of Whitby, held to decide on a possible unification of the Celtic and Roman churches.

This was never going to be an easy matter to resolve, and it says much about the universal respect in which she was held by those on both sides of the argument that her abbey was the venue chosen.

The feeling among all delegates appears to have been that, should an impasse be reached, Hilda would prove to be an excellent arbitrator and would not allow her Celtic leanings to cloud her judgement.

The eventual and highly significant outcome of the synod was that it was resolved that the Roman ways, traditions, beliefs, dress, services and method of calculating the date of Easter would be followed by all the country's churches.

While some leaders of the Celtic church were unhappy with this decision and returned to Ireland or Iona to follow their own ways, others, like Hilda, saw the need for compromise and resolved to support the new regime.

Along with her part in the Synod of Whitby, Hilda is remembered even now for her empathy with one particular lay brother, in essence a labourer who lived with the monks and nuns.

His name was Caedmon.

Again, posterity has the Venerable Bede to thank for being the only original source for this story.

Caedmon was a herdsman.

One particular evening while the monks were singing, playing the harp and generally enjoying themselves, he slipped quietly away, knowing that they would ask him to join in.

He knew no songs or poems and was completely unmusical.

It was something Caedmon had done many times before, but this time when he fell asleep he was spoken to in a dream by a stranger, who asked him to sing and showed him how to write a poem praising God as the creator of heaven and earth.

ON waking the next morning, he could remember and recite the poem perfectly and showed off his newly acquired gift to his supervisor.

Astounded by what he heard, this man hurried Caedmon to see the Abbess Hilda, who was delighted that one of her lay brothers had been given this great gift.

She asked about his vision and gave him another poem to write based on a piece of sacred history.

The next day, the cowherd returned to Hilda with his new poem, equally as good as the first. She suggested that having received this gift from God, Caedmon should take his full monastic vows and ordered her assistants to teach the man sacred history and Christian doctrine.

Caedmon became a monk and remained at Whitby for the rest of his life.

Bede explains that Caedmon wrote many superb poems on a variety of subjects, but the only one which survives that can be proved definitely to have been written by Caedmon was this hymn:

Now [we] must honour the guardian of heaven, the might of the architect, and his purpose, the work of the father of glory as he, the eternal lord, established the beginning of wonders.

He, the holy creator, first created heaven as a roof for the children of men.

Then the guardian of mankind, the eternal lord, the lord almighty, afterwards appointed the middle earth, the lands, for men.

Caedmon died between 670 and 680. It was also in 680, on November 17, that Hilda died, aged 66, having been very ill with fever for six years, during which time she never complained.

During the last year of her life, she set up another monastery at Hackness, 16 miles from Whitby.

She was buried at Whitby and was succeeded by Eanfleda, the widow of King Oswiu.

Nothing is known of the monastery at Whitby from the year of Hilda's death until its destruction by the Danes in 867.

After the Norman Conquest, a group of monks from Evesham founded the abbey again, this time as a Benedictine house but, in 1539, it suffered the same fate as many of its counterparts when it was closed and dismantled by the commissioners of King Henry VIII.

Some time after Hilda's death, her bones were dug up, washed with great ceremony and reinterred, but were subsequently reburied at Glastonbury.

http://medievalnews.blogspot.com/2007/05/nuns-who-played-key-roles-in-helping.html
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/01 23:36:02 (permalink)
0
 
 
Blessed Margaret of Louvain
(also known as Marguerite la Fière)
Feastday:  September 1

Born in Louvain, Brabant, Belgium, in 1207.  She died in 1225 (1235?) Her cultus was approved in 1905.

Margaret was a servant in an inn in Louvain. She saw robbers kill her employers.  They in turn pursued her to the banks of the Deel and murdered the 18-year-old. Her contemporary, Caesarius the Cistercian monk of Heisterbach states that she was about to enter the Cistercian convent when she was slain. They buried her body on the river bank where she was slain.

After miracles were wrought at her intercession, her body was translated to a chapel built to house them in Saint Peter's churchyard in the same city. Later the wooden structure was replaced by a stone one and adjoined to the church by breaking through a wall (Benedictines, Husenbeth).
 
She is the patron of martyrs.
post edited by Sophie - 2007/09/03 22:42:24
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/02 16:09:42 (permalink)
0
 



St. Maxima
Feastday: September 2
Died 304


Martyred slave of Rome and a companion of St. Ansanus. She was martyred by being beaten to death in the persecution conducted by Emperor Diocletian.
post edited by Sophie - 2007/09/03 22:44:10
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/03 16:45:15 (permalink)
0
 
 
 
 
 
Today, September 3, is the feast day of Saint Phoebe -- the woman Saint Paul calls “deacon of the church at Cenchreae” (Rom 16,1-2.)  In so doing, Paul is indicating that she held the ministry instituted by the Church (Acts 6,1-6).

Phoebe is the first known woman deacon and was seen as the prototype for ordained women deacons in the Early Church.

The Orthodox Church celebrates her feast day today also.

For more about Phoebe, see also: (link to follow)
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/03 17:42:32 (permalink)
0
 
 
 
 
 
Today September 3 is the feast day of Quenburga (Coenburga) of Wimborne

Died c. 735.

Saint Quenburga, Saint Cuthburga, and the future King Ina of Wessex were the children of Cenred, a lord of Wessex.

The two sisters founded Wimborne Abbey in Dorset about 705. Although it was a double abbey, it was intended primarily for nuns. Cuthburga was its first abbess. Wimborne was important for having produced Saints Lioba and Thecla, who were among the many religious who assisted Saint Boniface in his efforts to evangelize Germany (Farmer).
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/03 19:03:11 (permalink)
0
Phoebe
Deacon of Cenchrea
 


Phoebe, a woman from Cenchrea, was a friend to St. Paul. Scripture tells us she was a deacon in the early Church.

Cenchrea was the seaport of Corinth where Paul had established a Christian church. While working in Corinth he wrote his famous letter to the Romans and sent it by the hand of Phoebe. In Romans, chapter 16, her name stands at the head of a long list of noble workers.

She is called "diakonos."  While traditionally she has been called a "servant" of the church, diakonos translates to "deacon" which tells that Phoebe had an official position in the church at Corinth.

Scholars believe that Phoebe was also a business woman, having had affairs of her own to attend to in Rome. Paul urges the Christians at Rome to be of any possible assistance to her. He pays her high tribute by saying she has been of great help to many people, including himself. 
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/03 21:37:09 (permalink)
0
Today, September 3 is the feast day of the martyr, Saint Euphemia.



The Great-Martyr* SAINT EUPHEMIA

(click on icon for larger view)

from the Byzantine rite and the eastern Orthodox:

Euphemia lived at Chalcedon in the reign of Diocletian (284-305). Her parents were rich and devout and brought her up in the love of Christ. At that time, Priscus became Proconsul of Asia. He was an enthusiastic devotee of Mars, and ordered all the inhabitants of the Province to come to Chalcedon to celebrate the feast of his god, under pain of death. As a result, Christians fled in small groups to isolated houses or to the deserts in order to escape the tyrant and safeguard their faith. Saint Euphemia was among those who went into hiding.

They were soon discovered and brought before the Proconsul, who tried to persuade them to sacrifice by flattering their youth and good sense. “Do not waste your time and your words on us,” the Saint answered him. “We are people endowed with reason, for whom it would be the greatest disgrace to abandon the one true God, the Maker of heaven and earth, in order to worship dumb, senseless idols. We are not afraid of torments you threaten us with. They will be easy for us to bear and will show the power of our God.”

These words enraged the Proconsul, and he had Euphemia and her companions tortured continuously for twenty days. Finding their faith completely unshaken, and seeing that Euphemia was the leading spirit of the group, he ordered her limbs to be crushed by iron wheels. But the Martyr called upon the help of God and was discovered to be completely unscathed. Then she was cast into a furnace with flames forty feet high, but God came to Euphemia’s aid there also, and sent an angel who drew the flames away from her. Seeing this miracle, the executioners Victor and Sosthenes turned to Christ, and died as Martyrs some days later. The Saint had many more torments to endure, from which God each time delivered her, showing how much stronger Grace is than any torture devised by man. In the end, she was thrown to the beasts, and gave up her soul to God through the mere bite of a bear.

When the persecution of Diocletian ended, the Christians laid Saint Euphemia’s relics in a golden sarcophagus, placed within a church that was dedicated to her. Her relics attracted crowds of pilgrims for centuries. They were moved to Constantinople in 616 at the time of the Persian invasions, and remain intact to this day in the church of the Patriarchate at the Phanar.

The feast day of Saint Euphemia is celebrated on September 16 [in the Byzantine rite.]

Portions of the preceding text are from “The Synaxarion: The Lives of the Saints of the Orthodox Church” by Hieromonk Makarios of Simonos Petra, and translated from the French by Christopher Hookway
 
http://www.saintbarbara.org/about/icons/euphemia.cfm
 
* Great-martyr: one who was martyred for the faith and suffered torture


post edited by Sophie - 2007/09/03 21:52:28
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/03 23:10:12 (permalink)
0

Dear friends,

Women martyrs are significant not only as witnesses to our faith but also to the case which supports inclusion of women in Holy Orders.

Throughout the Church’s history, women no less than men, have witnessed to their Christian faith unto death. According to ancient tradition, men or women on the way to martyrdom had the power to forgive sins.

The Apostolic Tradition of Hippolytus (3rd cent) states that any ‘confessor’ imprisoned for faith automatically attained the rank of presbyter (priest) in the Roman communities.

Sts. Irenaeus (2nd cent) and Cyprian (3rd cent) apply this ‘power of martyrdom’ equally to women confessors. Since women, too, shared in the power of the keys, binding and loosening on behalf of Christ, women, too belong in Holy Orders.

with love and blessings,
~Sophie~ 
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Scores: 0
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Holy Women Through the Ages 2007/09/03 23:12:58 (permalink)
0
 
 
 
 
 
from www.catholic.org -
 
Saint Euphemia
Feastday: September 3
1st century


Martyr with Dorothy, Thecla, and Erasma at Aquileia, Italy. They are revered in Venice and Ravenna.
Page: << < ..678910.. > >> Showing page 10 of 26 - Powered by APG vNext Trial
Jump to:
© 2018 APG vNext Trial Version 4.6

This website is maintained by the Wijngaards Institute for Catholic Research.

Wijngaards Institute for Catholic Research

Visitors to www.womenpriests.org since 11 January 2014

Wijngaards Institute for Catholic Research