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Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ

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Sophie
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2007/11/22 03:39:16 (permalink)
ORIGINAL: Guest

Since you women have already been excommunicated and ceased communion with Rome, I can only pity you. If only you could spent your time and energy more constructively like combatting the growing liturgical abuses or growing protestantization of the Mass - Pizza Masses etc, the Church would have been a better place. Hiaz


Dear Hiaz,

Thank you for your comments. My name is Sophie. As part of the womenpriests Team,  I am the Moderator of Circles dialogues here. If I can be of any assistance, please let me know.

I read your comments with interest.  By virtue of what you say, I suspect you have us confused with other groups who also support women's ordination  but are doing so through the pursuit of illegal ordination. We at www.womenpriests.org are not. I will explain why.

And yes... It is true.  Some of the women -- but not all -- who have been illegally ordained have been excommunicated.  If I am not mistaken, the  Archbishop with jurisdiction in Saint Louis, Missouri, the site of the most recent 'contra legem' (illegal) ordinations, responded with the sanction of interdict instead of excommunication.  If you like, I can check about that.  Please let me know.

In the meantime, the purpose and strategy of our work at www.womenpriests.org is this.  While we support reforms that will eventually see change in the Catholic Church so as to make women candidates for all seven sacraments (ie ordination included), we are convinced that it is important for reform to take place within the parameters of our global Church community in union with the Pope.

While we have great sympathy with Catholic women who feel utterly frustrated by the intransigence of the hierarchy and while we appreciate their good intentions and the reasons that bring them to take such a drastic step, we are concerned that illegal ordinations carry with them the real risk of schism.  Even though the women involved want to remain fully Catholic, the communities they minister to may soon drift out of the Church (Christian history shows this.) The authority of the Churdh, however misguided it sometimes is in what it does, should not be undermined. 

Moreover, by following their route 'against the law' they may also endanger the process of getting women's ordination recognised from within the Church. We realise the prophetic value the river ordinations may have had -- in the long run they may prove counter-productive for the cause of seeing the whole Catholic Church opening its doors to the ordination of any suitable woman who is called.

These reasons are more fully explained here: http://www.womenpriests.org/called/dublin.asp  See also:
http://www.womenpriests.org/called/options.asp 

Our  website does not serve the interests of some small action groups. We are part of the mainstream Catholic tradition, and it is from within that truly Catholic tradition that we know the ban against women must be and will be lifted.

But we realise that the Holy Spirit may move different people to express her displeasure and her hopes...

If you have questions, please let me know.

with love and blessings in the peace of Christ,

~Sophie~
post edited by Sophie - 2008/06/26 14:55:57
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2007/11/22 04:44:28 (permalink)
Then, Zacharias brought the child into the Holy of Holies—a place where only the High Priest was permitted to enter once a year on the Day of Atonement.

 
Imagine that !  A woman in the Holy of Holies!
 
This tradition of the Presentation of Mary in the Temple reads to me like Mary in seminary training...a priest in the making which in fact she did become.
 
 
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2007/11/22 17:49:21 (permalink)
Yes Jesus continued this newness of Christianity that women were worthy to be deacons and priests too.  Mary is brought to the holy of holy temple just like men are admitted.
 
Mary is taught scripture like men are in the temple.
 
Jesus made women seminarians, Jesus personally taught Mary of Bethany despite Martha's be a housekeeper cleaner cook only protests, Jesus defended teaching Mary "learning theology  is the better part, will not be taken away from her".
 
Jesus personally taught the Samaritan woman theology and instructed her God was Spirit, not limited to Jerusalem, gave her living waters of faith, Jesus is the Messiah--Samaritan woman is the ultimate seminarian just like the men, and Jesus praises her to the astonished males as she reaps the harvest while they do nothing, she preaches to the gentiles of Samaria.
 
There is no reason why women should be excluded from seminaries or priest training or ordination in the Roman Catholic Church.
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2007/11/30 18:42:34 (permalink)
Hiaz  
 
 This Website is all about getting women LEGALLY Ordained in the Roman Catholic Church.  We are NOT excommunicated at all!
 
Please actually look at this website before you type.  You mix this up with what it is not.  Look at the main page, look at any of the forum or threads. LEGAL ordination!
 
We seek Reform WITHIN the church, making it so that women too are LEGALLY Ordained in the church just as men are now.
 
   Explain please how it can possibly be your position we must keep out women from ordination when Jesus made women fellow priests and apostles in the church?
 
   Papal letters, archelogical evidence, church archives, ancient church statutes of Apostles and ancient church manuals, gravestones of women priests of antiquity of Christianity , New Testament texts of Paul and Peter all prove women were priests, deacons, even bishops in our  Catholic church.
 
   How can you defend such a position when Jesus and St. Peter and St. Paul tell us women are equal to men and encourage women to fufill all roles men fufill in the church of Jesus?
 
    Excluding women and silencing women was NOT what Jesus did and this error of the church, refusing to ordain women must be corrected to allow women ordination.
 
                                                                                                                                                                                                 Tony
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2007/12/07 21:38:45 (permalink)
I have heard people refer to Mary as the New Eve, but there seems to be more of a parallel between Mary and Moses. Both Mary and Moses were servants of God, meek and humble and yet in possession of great courage and stamina.
 
God used Moses to deliver the Israelites from slavery. God used Mary to deliver humanity from the slavery of sin. Moses brought the Word of God to the Israelites on stone tablets. Mary brought the Word of God to humanity in the flesh.
 
Mary was indeed a priest, blessed and ordained by God. God worked the greatest miracle through this woman without any participation from a man. Through Mary alone, God became tangible and that tangible presence lives on for us in the Eucharist.
 
If a woman could bring the tangible presence of Christ to the world in the flesh, women should be able to carry on the Tradition of bringing the tangible presence of Christ to the world through the Eucharist.
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2007/12/20 22:13:32 (permalink)
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2008/04/16 23:42:37 (permalink)
Isn’t it interesting how God keeps sending Mary to instruct us in matters of church doctrine and morals?
 
What happened to the guy with the keys?
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2008/04/17 15:35:53 (permalink)
What a astute observation!
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2008/04/17 18:26:09 (permalink)
Mary Magdalene, Junia, Susanna, Lydia, Joanna and the other women apostles were given the keys to the kingdom too .
 
Mary Of Bethany and Samaritan woman were personally taught how to "drive " and use those keys by Jesus himself.
 
Women ought to be sharing the keys with the men, and the popemobile should not be part of an all male clergy club entourage that never lets the women share the keys and the responsibilities, the service to God in the church,
 
Women ought to be ordained too.  Time for the pope to really image Christ.
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2008/05/31 22:50:38 (permalink)
Today May 31 is the feastday of the Visitation
 
 
The-Visitation, by He Qi, China

Thereupon Mary set out, proceeding in haste into the hill country to a town of Judah, where she entered Zechariah's house and greeted Elizabeth. When Elizabeth heard Mary's greeting, the baby leapt in her womb. Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit and cried out in a loud voice: "Blest are you among women and blest is the fruit of your womb. But who am I that the mother of my Lord should come to me? The moment your greeting sounded in my ears, the baby leapt in my womb for joy. Blest is she who trusted that the Lord's words to her would be fulfilled."

Mary remained with Elizabeth about three months and then returned home.

Luke 1:39-45,56

michele kennan
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2008/06/26 11:21:41 (permalink)
I want to thank you for this website. I appreciate very much all the work and enjoy the scholarship. Thank you
Michele Kennan

Michele Kennan
Sophie
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2008/06/27 02:11:13 (permalink)
 
 
 
 
Dear Michele,
 
On behalf of the Guests, Members and Team here at www.womenpriests.org I send you a hearty welcome.  In my capacity as moderator and traffic director of Cirlces dialogues, if there is anything I can do to help with questions or concerns, please let me know.
 
We look forward to hearing your thoughts and views!
 
with love and blessings,
 
~Sophie~
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2008/06/27 04:27:03 (permalink)
Pope to Bestow Pallium on 43
5 Archbishops From North America


VATICAN CITY, JUNE 25, 2008 (Zenit.org).- Benedict XVI will confer the pallium on 43 metropolitan archbishops in a traditional ceremony on the feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, the first day of the Pauline Jubilee Year.


Pope Benedict XVI bestowing pallium on Archbishop of Toronto, Canada, Thomas Christopher Collins during a ceremony inside St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, June 29, 2007. During the ceremony the pontiff bestowed the pallium, or a wool shawl, on 46 archbishops from around the world to symbolize their bond with the Vatican.

The pallium, worn by the Pope and archbishops, symbolizes the lost sheep that is found again, carried on the shoulders of the Good Shepherd, and the Lamb crucified for the salvation of humanity. It also symbolizes, in part, the Pope's concession of authority and communion to heads of major local Churches.


In this photo provided by the Vatican newspaper L'Osservatore Romano, Archbishop of Toronto, Canada, Thomas Christopher Collins walks away after receiving a pallium from Pope Benedict XVI during a ceremony inside St.Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, Friday, June 29, 2007. During the ceremony the pontiff bestowed the pallium, or a wool shawl, on 46 archbishops from around the world to symbolize their bond with the Vatican.

Here is the list of those who will receive the pallium. There are five archbishops serving in North America:

-- Archbishop Edwin O'Brien of Baltimore, Maryland
-- Archbishop Thomas Rodi of Mobile, Alabama
-- Archbishop John Clayton Nienstedt of St. Paul-Minneapolis, Minnesota

-- Archbishop Anthony Mancini of Halifax, Nova Scotia
-- Archbishop Martin Currie of St. John's, Newfoundland


Pope Innocent III depicted wearing the pallium

Fourteen in Europe:

-- Archbishop Francisco Pérez González of Pamplona-Tudela, Spain
-- Archbishop Paolo Pezzi of Mother of God in Moscow, Russia
-- Archbishop Tadeusz Kondrusiewicz of Minsk-Mohilev, Belarus

-- Archbishop Giancarlo Maria Bregantini of Campobasso-Boiano, Italy
-- Archbishop Reinhard Marx of Munich-Freising, Germany
-- Archbishop Slawoj Leszek Głodz of Gdansk, Poland

-- Archbishop Willem Eijk of Utrecht, Netherlands
-- Archbishop José Sanches Alves of Evora, Portugal
-- Archbishop Jan Babjak of Presov for Catholics of Byzantine rite, Slovakia

-- Archbishop Giovanni Paolo Benotto of Pisa, Italy
-- Archbishop Stanislav Zvolensky of Bratislava, Slovakia
-- Archbishop Laurent Ulrich of Lille, France

-- Archbishop Francesco Montenegro of Agrigento, Italy
-- Archbishop Marin Srakic of Djakovo-Osijek, Croatia


Pope Benedict wearing pallium

Three in Asia or the Middle East:

-- Archbishop John Hung Shan-Chuan of Taipei, Taiwan
-- Archbishop John Hiong Fun-Yit Yaw of Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia
-- His Beatitude Fouad Twal, Latin patriarch of Jerusalem


Pope Benedict wearing pallium

Seven in South America

-- Archbishop Lorenzo Voltolini Esti of Portoviejo, Ecuador
-- Archbishop Andrés Stanovnik of Corrientes, Argentina
-- Archbishop Mauro Aparecido dos Santos of Cascavel, Brazil

-- Archbishop Oscar Urbina Ortega of Villavicencio, Colombia
-- Archbishop Antonio López Castillo of Barquisimeto, Venezuela
-- Archbishop Agustín Radrizzani of Mercedes-Lujan, Argentina
-- Archbishop Luis Gonzaga Silva Pepeu of Vitoria da Conquista, Brazil


Pope Benedict wearing pallium

Seven in Africa:

-- Cardinal John Njue, archbishop of Nairobi, Kenya
-- Archbishop Michel Cartatéguy of Niamey, Niger
-- Archbishop Matthew Man-Oso Ndagoso of Kaduna, Nigeria

-- Archbishop Laurent Monsengwo Pasinya of Kinshasa, Congo
-- Archbishop Richard Burke of Benin City, Nigeria
-- Archbishop Thomas Kwaku Mensah of Kumasi, Ghana
-- Archbishop Peter Kairo of Nyeri, Kenya



Pallium

Four in the Caribbean

-- Archbishop Robert Rivas of Castries, St. Lucia
-- Archbishop Louis Kebreau of Cap Haitien, Haiti
-- Archbishop Donald Reece of Kingston in Jamaica
-- Archbishop Joseph Serge Miot of Port au Prince, Haiti


History of the development of the pallium

And one in Oceania:

-- Archbishop John Ribat of Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea


Pope John Paul II wearing circular pallium

Two archbishops will receive the pallium in their metropolitan sees:

-- Archbishop William D'Souza of Patna, India
-- Archbishop Edward Tamba Charles of Freetown-Bo, Sierra Leone.

http://www.zenit.org/article-23020?l=english
Sophie
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2008/06/27 04:27:33 (permalink)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The significance of the pallium in the case for women priests?  More to follow!
Sophie
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2008/06/27 04:28:43 (permalink)

 
Mary wearing the Bishop's pallium
Sophie
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2008/06/27 04:41:57 (permalink)
Benedict XVI Changing Pallium Again
Aide Says Beauty More Important Than Antiquity or Modernity

zenit.org
June 26, 2008

VATICAN CITY, JUNE 26, 2008 (Zenit.org).- Benedict XVI will begin using a pallium of a different shape, said a Vatican official, citing "several problems and inconveniences" with the Pope's current model.


Pope Benedict's pallium being adjusted

Beginning Sunday, feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, the Holy Father will use a new pallium. It will be circular and larger than his current one, with two pendants in the middle of the chest and back, and including the characteristic red crosses.

Monsignor Guido Marini, master of papal liturgical ceremonies, explained to L'Osservatore Romano this change brings back something of the form of the pallium used before Pope John Paul II, though longer and with red crosses (previously, the crosses were black).

Benedict XVI's current model, which he chose at the beginning of his pontificate, hearkens back to the sixth century. The end of the cloth drapes over his left shoulder.

The papal pallium, a liturgical vestment used since ancient times, is a white woolen band worn over the chasuble by the pope and metropolitans archbishops. The pope's is different from those of the other archbishops.


Pope Gregory I wearing the pallium

The shape of the papal pallium has changed through the centuries, with the circular form coming into use in the 10th or 11th century.



Monsignor Marini explained that the pallium draped over the shoulder chosen by Benedict XVI after his election "entailed several problems and inconveniences"; hence the decision to return to the circular shape.

Rooted in Tradition

However, this is not the only change made in the papal liturgical vestments. For several months the Pope has decided to use a golden staff in the form of a Greek cross, used by Pope Pius IX, instead of the silver one with the figure of the Crucified, introduced by Pope Paul VI.

"This choice does not mean simply a return to the ancient, but shows development in continuity, a rooting in Tradition that allows going forward in an orderly manner on the path of history," Monsignor Marini said. "The pastoral staff, called 'ferula,' responds more faithfully to the form of the papal staff typical of the Roman tradition, which had always been in the shape of a cross and without the Crucified."



Benedict XVI has also retuned to the use of the camauro (a red cap with a white border used only in winter), which had fallen into disuse since Pope John XXIII's pontificate, as well as other ancient liturgical vestments.

Monsignor Marini explained that the "hermeneutics of continuity is always the exact criterion to read the path of the Church in time." This, which the popes carry out in regard to the magisterium, "is also valid for the liturgy, to indicate the same continuity of the 'lex orandi.'"



Benedict XVI "doesn't always use ancient liturgical vestments, but also modern ones," the monsignor clarified. "What is important is not so much antiquity or modernity, but beauty and dignity, important components of all liturgical celebrations."

 http://www.zenit.org/article-23034?l=english
Sophie
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2008/06/27 04:43:05 (permalink)
What is the pallium and why is it significant to the case for women priests?

The Pallium or Pall (derived from the Roman pallium or palla, a woollen cloak) is an ecclesiastical vestment in the Roman Catholic Church, originally peculiar to the Pope, but for many centuries bestowed by him on metropolitans and primates as a symbol of the jurisdiction delegated to them by the Holy See.


Pope Innocent III depicted wearing
the pallium in a fresco at the Sacro Speco cloister.
 
Description
 
The pallium, in its present form, is a narrow band, "three fingers broad," woven of white lamb's wool from sheep raised by Trappist monks, with a loop in the centre resting on the shoulders over the chasuble, and two dependent lappets, before and behind; so that when seen from front or back the ornament resembles the letter Y. It is decorated with six black crosses, one on each tail and four on the loop, is doubled on the left shoulder, and is garnished, back and front, with three jewelled gold pins.

The two latter characteristics seem to be survivals of the time when the Roman pallium was a simple scarf doubled and pinned on the left shoulder.

In origin the pallium and the omophorion are the same vestment. The omophorion is a wide band of cloth, much larger than the modern pallium, worn by all Eastern Orthodox bishops and Eastern Catholic bishops of the Byzantine Rite. The theory that explains its origin in connection with the figure of the Good Shepherd carrying the lamb on his shoulders, so common in early Christian art, is obviously an explanation a posteriori.

The ceremonial connected with the preparation of the pallium and its bestowal upon the Pope at his coronation, however, suggests some such symbolism. The lambs whose wool is destined for the making of the pallia are solemnly presented at the altar by the nuns of the convent of Saint Agnes.
 
The awarding of the pallium became controversial in the Middle Ages, because popes charged a fee from those receiving them, earning hundreds of millions of gold florins for the papacy and bringing the award of the pallium into disrepute. This process was condemned by the Council of Basle in 1432, which referred to it as "the most usurious contrivance ever invented by the papacy." The fee was later abandoned amid charges of simony.
 
For his formal inauguration Pope Benedict XVI reverted to an earlier form of the pallium, from a period when it and the omophorion were virtually identical. It is wider than the modern pallium although not as wide as the modern omophorion, made of wool with black silk ends, and decorated with five red crosses, three of which are pierced with pins, symbolic of Christ's five wounds and the three nails. Only the Papal pallium takes this distinctive form.

At present only the Pope and metropolitan archbishops wear the pallium, and a metropolitan has to receive the pallium before exercising his office in his ecclesiastical province, even if he was previously metropolitan elsewhere. No other bishops, even non-metropolitan archbishops or retired metropolitans, are allowed to wear the pallium unless they have special permission. For example, Angelo Cardinal Sodano, the newly elected Dean of the College of Cardinals, received the privilege of wearing the pallium for the suburbicarian diocese of Ostia on June 29, 2005.

History
 
It is impossible to indicate exactly when the pallium was first introduced. According to the Liber Pontificalis, it was first used in the first half of the fourth century. This book relates, in the life of Pope Marcus (†336), that he conferred the right of wearing the pallium on the Bishop of Ostia, because the consecration of the pope appertained to him. At any rate, the wearing of the pallium was usual in the fifth century; this is indicated by the above-mentioned reference contained in the life of St. Marcus which dates from the beginning of the sixth century, as well as by the conferring of the pallium on St. Cæsarius of Arles by Pope Symmachus in 513. Besides, in numerous other references of the sixth century, the pallium is mentioned as a long-customary vestment. It seems that, from the beginning, the pope alone had the absolute right of wearing the pallium. Its use by others was tolerated only by virtue of the permission of the pope. We hear of the pallium being conferred on others, as a mark of distinction, as early as the sixth century. The honour was usually conferred on metropolitans, especially those nominated vicars by the pope, but it was sometimes conferred on simple bishops (e.g., on Syagrius of Autun, Donus of Messina, and John of Syracuse by Pope Gregory I).

The use of the pallium among metropolitans did not become general until the ninth century, when the obligation was laid upon all Western metropolitans of forwarding a petition for the pallium accompanied by a solemn profession of faith, all consecrations being forbidden them before the reception of the pallium. The object of this rule was to bring the metropolitans into more intimate connection with the seat of unity and the source of all metropolitan prerogatives, the Holy See, to counteract the aspirations of various autonomy-seeking metropolitans, which were incompatible with the Roman understanding of the church, and to counteract the disharmony arising therefrom: the rule was intended, not to kill, but to revivify metropolitan jurisdiction. The oath of allegiance which the recipient of the pallium takes today originated, apparently, in the eleventh century. It is met with during the reign of Paschal II (1099–118), and replaced the profession of faith. It is certain that a tribute was paid for the reception of the pallium as early as the sixth century. This was abrogated by Pope Gregory I in the Roman Synod of 595, but was reintroduced later as partial maintenance of the Holy See. These pallium contributions have often been, since the Middle Ages, the subject of embittered controversies.

Origin

There are many different opinions concerning the origin of the pallium.

Some trace it to an investiture by Constantine I (or one of his successors); others consider it an imitation of the Hebrew ephod, the humeral garment of the High Priest. Others again declare that its origin is traceable to a mantle of Saint Peter, which was symbolical of his office as supreme pastor. A fourth hypothesis finds its origin in a liturgical mantle, which, it is asserted, was used by the early popes, and which in the course of time was folded into the shape of a band; a fifth says its origin dates from the custom of folding the ordinary mantle-pallium, an outer garment in use in imperial times; a sixth declares that it was introduced immediately as a papal liturgical garment, which, however, was not at first a narrow strip of cloth, but, as the name suggests, a broad, oblong, and folded cloth. To trace it to an investiture of the emperor, to the ephod of the Jewish High Priest, or to a fabled mantle of St. Peter, is entirely inadmissible. The correct view may well be that the pallium was introduced as a liturgical badge of the pope, and it does not seem improbable that it was adopted in imitation of its counterpart, the pontifical omophorion, already in vogue in the Eastern Church.

Development

There is a decided difference between the form of the modern pallium and that used in early Christian times, as portrayed in the Ravenna mosaics. The pallium of the sixth century was a long, moderately wide, white band of wool, ornamented at its extremity with a black or red cross, and finished off with tassels; it was draped around the neck, shoulders, and breast in such a manner that it formed a V in front, and the ends hung down from the left shoulder, one in front and one behind.

In the eighth century it became customary to let the ends fall down, one in the middle of the breast and the other in the middle of the back, and to fasten them there with pins, the pallium thus becoming Y-shaped. A further development took place during the ninth century (according to pictorial representations, at first outside of Rome where ancient traditions were not maintained so strictly): the band, which had hitherto been kept in place by the pins, was sewn Y-shaped, without, however, being cut.

The present circular form originated in the tenth or eleventh century. Two excellent early examples of this form, belonging respectively to Archbishop St. Heribert (1021) and Archbishop St. Anno (d. 1075), are preserved in Siegburg, Archdiocese of Cologne. The two vertical bands of the circular pallium were very long until the fifteenth century, but were later repeatedly shortened until they now have a length of only about twelve inches. At first the only decorations on the pallium were two crosses near the extremities. This is proved by the mosaics at Ravenna and Rome. It appears that the ornamentation of the pallium with a greater number of crosses did not become customary until the ninth century, when small crosses were sewn on the pallium, especially over the shoulders. There was, however, during the Middle Ages no definite rule regulating the number of crosses, nor was there any precept determining their colour. They were generally dark, but sometimes red. The pins, which at first served to keep the pallium in place, were retained as ornaments even after the pallium was sewn in the proper shape, although they no longer had any practical object. That the insertion of small leaden weights in the vertical ends of the pallium was usual as early as the thirteenth century is proved by the discovery in 1605 of the pallium enveloping the body of Boniface VIII, and by the fragments of the pallium found in the tomb of Clement IV.

Modern use

 

Pope John Paul II vested in the pallium
click on image to enlarge
 
The modern pallium is a circular band about two inches wide, worn about the neck, breast and shoulders. It has two pendants, one hanging down in front and one behind, which are about two inches wide and twelve inches long, and are weighted with small pieces of lead covered with black silk.

The remainder of the pallium is made of white wool, part of which is supplied by two lambs presented annually as a tax by the Lateran Canons Regular to the Chapter of St. John on the feast of Saint Agnes (January 21, her name is similar to the Latin word "agnus", meaning lamb), solemnly blessed on the high altar of that church after the pontifical Mass, and then offered to the pope. The ornamentation of the pallium consists of six small black crosses -- one each on the breast and back, one on each shoulder and one on each pendant. The crosses on the breast, back and left shoulder are provided with a loop for the reception of a gold pin set with a precious stone. The pallium is worn over the chasuble.

The use of the pallium is reserved to the pope and archbishops who are metropolitans, but the latter may not use it until it is conferred upon them by the pope, normally at the celebration of the Feast of Saints Peter and Paul in June. The pallium is also conferred upon the Latin Rite Patriarch of Jerusalem. Previous traditions that allowed some other bishops to use the pallium were ended by Pope Paul VI in a motu proprio in 1978. A metropolitan archbishop may wear his pallium as a mark of his jurisdiction not only in his own archdiocese but anywhere in his ecclesiastical province whenever he celebrates Mass (Canon 437, Code of Canon Law, 1983).

Although the pallium is now reserved, by law and liturgical norms, to metropolitans, a single standing exception has seemed to become customary: Pope John Paul II conferred a pallium on then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger when Ratzinger became dean of the College of Cardinals and therefore also Cardinal Bishop of Ostia, a purely honorary title and one without an archbishopric or metropolitanate attached. When Ratzinger was elected Pope Benedict XVI, he continued that exception without comment by conferring the pallium on Cardinal Angelo Sodano, the new dean.


Pope Benedict XVI in his distinctive papal pallium
 
Worn by the pope, the pallium symbolizes the plenitudo pontificalis officii (i.e., the "plenitude of pontifical office"); worn by archbishops, it typifies their participation in the supreme pastoral power of the pope, who concedes it to them for their proper church provinces. An archbishop who has not received the pallium may therefore not exercise any of his functions as metropolitan, nor any metropolitan prerogatives whatever.

Similarly, after his resignation, he may not use the pallium; should he be transferred to another archdiocese, he must again petition the Holy Father for a new pallium. The new pallia are solemnly blessed after the Second Vespers on the feast of Saints Peter and Paul, and are then kept in a special silver-gilt casket near the Confessio Petri (tomb of St. Peter) until required. The pallium was formerly conferred in Rome by a cardinal deacon, and outside of Rome by a bishop; in both cases the ceremony took place after the celebration of Mass and the administration of an oath.

Since the Second Vatican Council (1962-65), the liturgy for the conferral of the pallium as it appears in the liturgical books is to take place at the beginning of the Mass in which the archbishop takes possession of his see; however, the practice of Pope John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI has actually been to summon all new archbishops to Rome to receive the pallium directly from the hands of the pope on the Feast of Saints Peter and Paul.

Significance
 
As early as the sixth century the pallium was considered a liturgical vestment to be used only in the church, and indeed only during Mass, unless a special privilege determined otherwise. This is proved conclusively by the correspondence between Gregory I and John of Ravenna concerning the use of the pallium. The rules regulating the original use of the pallium cannot be determined with certainty, but its use, even before the sixth century, seems to have had a definite liturgical character. From early times more or less extensive restrictions limited the use of the pallium to certain days. Its indiscriminate use, permitted to Hincmar of Reims by Leo IV (851) and to Bruno of Cologne by Agapetus II (954) was contrary to the general custom. In the tenth and eleventh centuries, just as today, the general rule was to limit the use of the pallium to a few festivals and some other extraordinary occasions. The symbolic character now attached to the pallium dates back to the time when it was made an obligation for all metropolitans to petition the Holy See for permission to use it. The evolution of this character was complete about the end of the eleventh century; thenceforth the pallium is always designated in the papal bulls as the symbol of plenitudo pontificalis officii. In the sixth century the pallium was the symbol of the papal office and the papal power, and for this reason Pope Felix transmitted his pallium to his archdeacon, when, contrary to custom, he nominated him his successor. When used by metropolitans, the pallium originally signified simply union with the Apostolic See, and was the symbol of the ornaments of virtue which should adorn the life of the wearer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pallium
Sophie
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2008/06/27 04:43:25 (permalink)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
More to follow!
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2008/08/20 23:36:07 (permalink)
We must ‘cultivate knowledge and devotion to the saints,’ Holy Father exhorts
Catholic News Agency
August 20, 2008



Castelgandolfo, Aug 20, 2008 / 10:26 am (CNA).- During today’s general audience in the courtyard of the Apostolic Palace in Castel Gandolfo, Pope Benedict XVI recalled the saints and feasts the liturgical calendar celebrates this week and the next.

The Holy Father said, “Every day the Church offers us one or more saints and blessed to invoke and to imitate.” He proceeded to speak about yesterday’s Feast of St. John Eudes, who confronted with 17th century Jansenism and promoted devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Holy Heart of Mary.

Pope Benedict also spoke about St. Bernard of Clairvaux. Bernard, who Pope Pius VIII labeled the “Honey-Sweet Doctor” for his eloquence, traveled throughout Europe defending the Christian faith.  The Holy Father added, “He was also remembered as a Doctor of Mariology, not because he wrote extensively on Our Lady, but because he understood her essential role in the Church, presenting her as the perfect model of the monastic life and of every other form of the Christian life.”

Pope Benedict recounted that tomorrow the Church celebrates the feast of St. Pius X, next Friday, the memorial of the Queenship of Mary, and next Saturday, the feast of St. Rose of Lima.

Pope Benedict said that the Church offers human beings the possibility of walking in the company of the saints. Hans Urs von Balthasar wrote that the saints represent a real way for us to access Jesus.  French writer Jean Guitton explained that the each saint reflects the light of God’s holiness. The Holy Father added that it is important “to cultivate knowledge and devotion to the saints, along with daily meditation on the Word of God and a child-like love for Our Lady”.

Pope Benedict stated, “The summer months provide an opportunity for us to read about the lives of these and all the saints.” He explained, “Their human and spiritual experiences show us that holiness is not a luxury, nor a privilege for a few.” The Holy Father continued, “It is the common destiny of all men called to be sons and daughters of God.”

Pope Benedict concluded by recalling that the great French writer Bernanos, who was fascinated with the idea of the saints and quoted many of them in his works said, “Every life of a saint is like a new flowering.”

At the end of his public audience, the Holy Father greeted English-speaking pilgrims from different corners of the globe, including groups from Malta and Ireland.

http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/new.php?n=13580
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RE: Mary: Model Priest, The First Priest After Christ 2008/08/20 23:38:32 (permalink)

 
Pope Benedict also spoke about St. Bernard of Clairvaux. Bernard, who Pope Pius VIII labeled the “Honey-Sweet Doctor” for his eloquence, traveled throughout Europe defending the Christian faith.  The Holy Father added, “He was also remembered as a Doctor of Mariology, not because he wrote extensively on Our Lady, but because he understood her essential role in the Church, presenting her as the perfect model of the monastic life and of every other form of the Christian life.”
 

 
Dear friends,

St. Bernard of Clairvaux, whose feast day we celebrate today, plays an important role in the case for women's ordination.  Are you wondering why?


Bernard receiving milk from the breast of the Virgin Mary. The scene is a legend which allegedly took place at Speyer Cathedral in 1146. 

The founder of the Abbey of Clairvaux, prolific preacher and writer, St. Bernard had an enormous influence on his contemporaries. He was canonised in 1174, and declared a Doctor of the Church in 1830 AD.  He is also one of many saints, bishops, spiritual authors, theologians and even Popes who throughout history have recognised Jesus's mother Mary as Priest. The devotion to Mary Priest is a latent Tradition that implies women can be ordained.  Though Bernard never literally applied the title ‘priest’ to Mary, he attributed sacrificial actions to her. The text quoted below helped to spark off the devotion to Mary Priest.


Mosaic of Mary Priest in Archbishop’s Chapel, Ravenna, 11th century (?)..This painting hangs over the altar of the archiepiscopal chapel at Ravenna. The mosaic originally came from the apse of the Basilica Ursiana. Notice the white pallium over a dark chasuble. Mary is here portrayed as a ‘High Priest’, interceding with God for people, which is one of the highpriestly tasks mentioned in Hebrews 5,1. Intercession and mediation are among the priestly functions ascribed to Mary by the Fathers of the Church. Credit. The image can be found in Sub Matris Tutela by Christa Belting-Ihm, Carl Winter, Heidelberg 1976, plate XVIb. For a larger size picture (190 Kb), please click here or on the smaller image. http://www.womenpriests.org/mrpriest/gallery1.asp 

For instance, in document from our library found here: http://www.womenpriests.org/mrpriest/bernard1.asp, we learn that in his writings we read:



‘ O consecrated Virgin, offer your son and present to the Lord the blessed fruit of your womb. Offer for our reconciliation to all, this holy victim, agreeable to God. The Father will fully accept this new sacrifice, this precious oblation (victim) of whom he himself has said: “This is my well beloved Son in whom I have put my love” (Mt 3, 7).

(This text presupposes familiarity with the Gospel text of the Presentation of Christ.)


And also:



‘But this offering, my brothers, may seem rather easy to you since the victim offered to the Lord is redeemed by birds, and therefore released. The time will come when this victim will no longer be offered in the Temple, nor in the arms of Simeon, but outside the city and in the arms of the cross. The time will come when the victim will not be redeemed by anything else, but when it will redeem others by the price of its blood. Then it will be the evening sacrifice. Now we are still at the sacrifice of the morning. This one, surely, is more pleasant; the other one will be more complete. The word of prophecy comes through: “He has been sacrificed because he has wanted it” (Is 52,7). If he is offered today [at the Presentation], in fact, this is not because he needs to be offered, nor that he falls under the law, but because he himself wanted it. Also on the cross he was offered, not because he deserved it, neither because the Jews could do it, but because he wanted it himself.’

- 'In Purificatione Mariae’, Sermo III, in Sancti Bernardi Opera Omnia, ed. J. Mabillon, Paris 1982, p. 370 col. b


And also:



“St. Bernard calls Mary ‘consecrated’ because she was consecrated to the priestly function of offering sacrifice . . . .Mary carries in herself a priestly soul of the highest degree...Her soul was bathed through the anointing of the Holy Spirit who covered her with his shadow. In this way a true royal and mystical priesthood was conferred on her.... Mary became for Jesus both priest and altar, the priest and the altar of this offering of the lamb of God anticipated on the day of her purification. ”

- Commentary by D. Nogues, Mariologie de S. Bernard, Paris 1935, p. 150.


See here for more information about Mary as Priest:


For more about other Church leaders and theologians who have written about Mary as priest, click here: Historical Survey

Learn more about the Tradition of Mary as Priest and its importance to the case for women's ordination, see here:

We also have another dialogue thread devoted to Mary.  It is found here:

If you have any questions, please let me know.
 
with love and blessings,

 
~Sophie~
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