Women Can Be Priests
Reply to post

Ordained Women Deacons

Page: < 12345 Showing page 5 of 5 - Powered by APG vNext Trial
Author
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: The Ordained Women's Diaconate 2008/01/24 00:12:26 (permalink)
 
 
Today, January 24, in the eastern Church is the feast day of ordained deacon, Saint Xenia.
 

Xenia, Deaconess of Rome
 
Our righteous Mother Xenia of Rome was of a distinguished family. While her parents were preparing to wed her, she stole away secretly, taking two handmaids with her, and departed for Mylasa of Karia in Asia Minor, and there she completed her life in asceticism. She was ordained deaconess by Paul, her spiritual father, who became Bishop of Mylasa.

Although she was originally named Eusebia, to conceal her identity, she took the name Xenia - which means "stranger" in Greek - because of her estrangement from her country.

http://www.goarch.org/en/chapel/saints.asp?contentid=401
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: The Ordained Women's Diaconate 2008/01/24 00:15:08 (permalink)
 
 
 
 
 
Deaconess and Saint Xenia: Born in Rome as ‘Eusebia’, the only daughter of a senator, she refused to marry as her parents desired. She fled to Kos with two servants where she started a community for women. She adopted the name ‘Xenia’ locals had given her (= ‘stranger’). She ministered as a deacon. She proved a great teacher of the faith.
 
In the western Church, her feast day falls on 4 February.
 
http://www.womenpriests.org/care/saints.asp
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: The Ordained Women's Diaconate 2008/01/24 00:40:32 (permalink)
Dear friends,

During the first nine centuries of the Church’s history, tens of thousands of women were ordained deacons to instruct women catechumens and assist in baptising them. Their ordination was substantially identical to that of the male deacon. The bishop would impose hands on them, invoking the Holy Spirit to grant them the ministry of the diaconate.



Copies of the ordination rite have been preserved in ancient manuscripts, like in the Barberini manuscript gr 336 (780 AD), part of which is displayed below.

Imposing his hands on the woman, the bishop prays:

Dedicate her to the task of you holy diaconate, and pour out into her the rich and abundant giving of your Holy Spirit.” “Preserve her so that she may always perform her ministry with orthodox faith and irreproachable conduct. 
The historical record of ordained women deacons -- like Saint Xenia -- proves that women were once part of Holy Orders in the Church.  Today, word is that Pope Benedict XVI is considering restoration of the ancient rite that would see to women's inclusion in at least this level of sacramental ordination.

Learn more about the ordination of women as deacons in the ancient Church, see here:

If you have any questions, please let me know.

with love and blessings,

~Sophie~
http://www.womenpriests.org/care/saints.asp
post edited by Sophie - 2008/01/24 00:41:35
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: The Ordained Women's Diaconate 2008/02/09 19:29:32 (permalink)


Saint Apollonia, Woman Deacon and Martyr
Feastday:  February 9

Apollonia is honoured not only in the Eastern Church, but also in the West. She lived in Alexandria in the third century. She was ordained a deacon and exercised her ministry as a deacon at a time when pagans were attempting to prevent the growth of Christianity. She was put to death by a mob by being burned on a fire.
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: The Ordained Women's Diaconate 2008/02/09 19:37:50 (permalink)
Apollonia (Apolline) of Alexandria VM (RM)
with Metras, Quinta, and Serapion MM

Feastday: February 9
 


Died in Alexandria in 249; feast day formerly February 7. Saint Apollonia was the miraculously conceived daughter of rich, barren parents. After nearly giving up hope of being blessed by a child despite constant prayers to her gods, Apollonia's mother begged the Blessed Virgin to intercede.
 
When in her youth the saint learned of the circumstances of her conception, she became a Christian. Directed by an angel, she went to Saint Leonine, a disciple of Saint Antony, for baptism. An angel then appeared with her baptismal robe and told her to go and preach in Alexandria, which she did. What I have written so fare is part of one version of a legend regarding Saint Apollonia, which ends with with her father giving her up to the authorities for martyrdom. Better sources are available.
 
During the persecution of Christians under Philip, Saint Apollonia was caught up in the midst of a bloodthirsty mob out to kill as many Christians as possible. Christians were dragged from their homes, while their property was looted. It started with a poet of Alexandria, who pretended to foretell disaster because of the presence of the impious Christians. He stirred up this great city.
 
The first victim of their rage was a venerable old man, named Metranus (Metras). When he refused to utter impious words against the worship of the true God, they beat him with staffs, thrust splinters of reeds into his eyes, and stoned him to death. The next person the mob seized was a Christian woman, called Cointha (Quinta), whom they carried to one of their temples to pay divine worship to the idol. She reproached the execrable divinity, which so exasperated the people that they tied her to the tail of a horse and dragged her over the pavement of sharp pebbles, cruelly scourged her, and put her to death. Another victim of this same cruelty was holy man called Serapion, who was tortured in his own house. After bruising his limbs, disjointing and breaking his bones, they threw him headlong from the top of the house onto the pavement, and so completed his martyrdom.
 
Apollonia was an old woman, a deaconess, but she was brave as the other Christians. Her bishop, Saint Dionysius, who witnessed her death, described it in a letter to Fabius and preserved by Eusebius, bishop of Antioch:

They seized that marvelous aged virgin Apollonia, broke out all her teeth with blows on her jaws, and piling up a bonfire before the city, threatened to burn her alive if she refused to recite with them their blasphemous sayings. But she asked for a brief delay. . . .

 
The mob believed that she was trying to decide whether or not to apostatize, but she was stalling so that they would know what she did was of her own volition. She clearly decided that none of them would have the pleasure of throwing her aged body into the fire. Expectantly, the mob let go of her and drew back. At this moment Apollonia "of her own accord leaped into the pyre, being kindled within by the greater fire of the Holy Spirit" (Roman Martyrology)- -to be honored ever since as a fearless Christian martyr. Saint Augustine conjectured that she acted according to a particular prompting of the Holy Spirit; otherwise, it would have been unlawful according to Church canon to take her own life.
 
It can never be lawful for a person by any action willfully to concur to, or hasten his own death, though many martyrs, out of a desire to lay down their lives for God, anticipated the executioners in completing their sacrifice. Rather it was a monstrous belief among the ancient Greeks and Romans that it was honorable, even heroic, to commit suicide in distress, as a remedy against temporal miseries. As Christians we believe that our lives are not our own, they belong to God. "The Lord gives and the Lord takes away. Blessed be the name of the Lord." Our lives are the greatest gift God has bestowed upon us. Whatever befalls us in this life, it takes more courage and greatness of spirit to endure sufferings patiently than to take our own lives. We see the example of Job in the Old Testament, and trust in God.
 
After the deaths of these four martyrs in ancient Alexandria, the rioters were in the height of their fury. Alexandria seemed like a city taken by storm. The Christians made no opposition, but betook themselves to flight, and beheld the loss of their goods with joy; for their hearts had no ties on earth. Their constancy was equal to their disinterestedness; for of all who fell into their hands, Saint Dionysius knew of none that renounced Christ. A civil war put an end to the fury of the populace, but the edict of Decius renewed it in 250. In this true story, we see the damage that can be caused by rumor.
 
Although altars and churches were soon dedicated to her in the West, Apollonia appears to have had no cultus in the East. Perhaps this was because she was soon confused with another Saint Apollonia who was martyred by Julian the Apostate. Of course, later artists and writers turned her into a beautiful young girl, daughter of a king, sometimes tortured by her own father by having her teeth extracted by pincers. Sometimes the story ends with the repentance of her father who vows to help those who suffer from toothache.
 
A quarterly publication for dentists out of Boston, Massachusetts, is called, appropriately, The Apollonian. Her feast is now celebrated only by those parishes of which she is the patroness (Benedictines, Bentley, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Farmer, Husenbeth, Tabor, White).
 
With good reason, Saint Apollonia is pictured holding a tooth (sometimes gold) with a pair of pincers. She may be shown after her teeth were pulled out or simply with a book and pincers. She is invoked against toothache (Roeder). If she does not have the pincers, she usually wears a necklace made of her own teeth (Bentley). She is the patron of dentists (White).
 
There is a frescoe of her by Luini at Saronno (Tabor).

http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/0209.shtml
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: The Ordained Women's Diaconate 2008/02/09 19:38:23 (permalink)

 
Saint Apollonia, Deaconess, Martyr
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Ordained Women Deacons 2008/02/09 21:58:18 (permalink)
Deaconess lost teeth, gained God: Egyptian saint, inspired by the Holy Spirit, jumped into flames of a deadly bonfire
By Tony Staley
Compass Editor 

St. Apollonia

When: c. 170-180 to 249
Where: Alexandria, Egypt

What: Deaconess and martyr
Feast: February 9

Patron: Dentists, toothaches and all dental diseases
 

Saint Apollonia, Ordained Deacon and Martyr
 
Many people fear going to the dentist. Perhaps they would feel strengthened by saying a prayer to St. Apollonia and then giving thanks that they won't have to face the ordeal she did.

St. Apollonia was a deaconess in Alexandria, a port city in the Nile Delta in northern Egypt. Deaconesses played an important role in the third century Eastern Church. Their duties included instructing catechumens, praying, visiting the sick, as well as pastoral and liturgical responsibilities.

At the time, young women faced such pagan temptations as wearing expensive jewelry, having their hair curled, wearing makeup and having their eyebrows plucked. While that may amuse us now, there were other concerns, including going to the theater, where plays often contained obscene material, and the public baths where mixed nude bathing led some to impure sexual acts.

One of the deaconess' duties was to make sure that female candidates for baptism led upright and moral lives. She met daily with candidates for prayer and to teach them about the Scriptures and Christian life. She continued to meet with them after baptism.

Her role in baptism was particularly important because the ritual called for candidates to disrobe, then step into the baptistery pool. The ritual then called for anointing of the entire body with oil, which for women could only be done by the deaconess; the minister anointed only the head after the deaconess had placed the baptismal gown over the woman.

A deaconess also was responsible for visiting sick Christian women living in pagan households. She was the doorkeeper at Mass, allowing only women to enter the women's section.

During Apollonia's earlier years many Christians were killed under Emperor Severus. After his death, Christians lived for nearly 50 years in peace until the last year of Emperor Philip's life when Christians again were persecuted.

During the latter persecution, a mob began rounding up Christians who refused to blaspheme God or worship idols. Most of those they captured were older people because the younger ones escaped from the city, leaving their belongings behind.

One of those caught was Apollonia, whom they beat severely before knocking out her teeth. Next, they dragged her through the city to a large bonfire and threatened to throw her on it. She asked for a moment to think. Her captors thought she had changed her mind, so as soon as they untied her, she jumped on the fire, an act that St. Augustine said was guided by the Holy Spirit.

Sources: Dictionary of Saints, Lives of the Saints, Patron Saints, Saints for Our Time and Women in Church History

http://www.thecompassnews.org/compass/2005-02-04/saintoftheday.shtml
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Ordained Women Deacons 2008/02/28 01:49:05 (permalink)
Saint Gorgonia, deacon, sister of Gregory Nazianzus (the Theologian), died 23 February c. 375.

Gorgonia was the daughter of Gregory the Elder and Nonna and the sister of Gregory Nazianzus (the Theologian) and Caesarius. Gorgonia married a man of some influence in Pisidia, sometimes called Vitolian, and other times Meletius. By at least one account, she is called the “pattern of a married saint.” She had several sons and three daughters, the most notable of whom was named Alypania. Later in her life, she converted her husband, and was baptized along with him and her sons and grandsons.

Two times in her life, she was miraculously cured of serious maladies. The first of these was caused by having been trampled by a team of mules, with broken bones and crushed internal organs. Yet Gorgonia would have no doctor, as she thought medical treatment indecent. According to legend, this modesty cured her. Another time, she cured herself of a desperate illness by anointing herself with “the sacred elements of the eucharist” mixed with her own tears, which she had shed with her head on the altar. As with the first ailment, the symptoms of headache, fever, paralysis, and sporadic coma disappeared through the strength of her prayer.

Gorgonia died about 375 of natural causes. Her father and mother were alive, though extremely old, at the time of her death. At her funeral, her brother Gregory of Nazianzus the Younger preached a eulogy which declared her a model Christian spouse and mother, as well as “The Paragon of Women” and “The Diamond of Her Sex.” Gorgonia is venerated as the patron saint of people afflicted by bodily ills or sickness.

The legacy of her charity has earned her the titles “Mother of Orphans,” “Eyes of the Blind,” and “Keeper of a Refuge of the Poor” in the Greek Orthodox Church. Her feast day on the calendar of saints is 9 December in the West and 23 February in the East, which is purported to be the date of her death.
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Ordained Women Deacons 2008/10/10 14:22:21 (permalink)
PRESS RELEASE FROM WOMENPRIESTS.ORG
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Reinstating the Diaconate for Women

An international Petition to the Pope asking for reinstatement of the ordained women’s diaconate will be handed in to the Vatican on Wednesday, October 15, 2008. A press conference in the ADISTA news agency in Rome will follow at 11 am that day. Dignitaries representing signatory organizations from around the world and representatives from various countries will be present at the function. A demonstration in Saint Peter’s Square by women dressed in ancient Greek/Hellenist clothing representing women deacons of the early Church will also be held.

Historical Background

It is historically documented that the diaconate of women existed in the Church since Apostolic times (Romans 16, 1; 1 Tim 3, 8-11). Tens of thousands of women deacons served in parishes during the first millennium as is witnessed in literary records, inscriptions on tombs and twenty two women deacon saints in the current liturgical calendar. Hundreds of women deacons are known to us by name. Ancient manuscripts have preserved the exact rite of ordination of women deacons (for more, see: http://womenpriests.org/deacons/default.asp)
 
Why is the Vatican is Suppressing the Historical Facts

Analysis of the ordination rite shows that the ordination of women deacons was a true sacrament with a bishop laying hands on the candidate and invoking the Holy Spirit. In all essentials the ordination of female deacons was identical to that of male deacons -- the sacramentality of whose ordination cannot be disputed. This means women did receive Holy Orders. For on July 15, 1563 the Council of Trent defined that the diaconate, as much as the priesthood and the episcopacy belongs to the sacrament of Holy Orders. "If anyone says that in the Catholic Church there does not exist a hierarchy, established through divine ordination, which consists of bishops, priests and deacons, let him be anathema." (Denzinger no 966).

Break with Tradition?

In an interview, John Wijngaards, author of Women Deacons in the Early Church:Historical Texts and Contemporary Debates (Continuum 2006) confirms: "In no way can the official Church claim that ordaining women deacons would be a break with tradition. The diaconate for women is needed today as much as it ever has been. Hundreds of thousands of women all over the world perform pastoral ministries that should be supported by the sacramental grace of ordination," he said.

Signatories:

Signatories of the Petition include at least twenty six international Catholic movements representing a membership of more than 40,000 people. In addition, more than fifteen hundred individuals have endorsed the Petition.

A text of the Petition (in six major languages used in the Church: English, Spanish, German, French, Italian and Dutch) can be found here:
http://womenpriests.org/dreamshareact/phpPETITION/ The exact details of the signatories can be found her: http://www.womenpriests.org/dreamshareact/phpPetition/results.php
 
Signatory representatives who will be present at the function include Jennifer Stark (UK), Coordinator of Women’s Ordination Worldwide (WOW), Aisha Taylor (USA), President of Women’s Ordination Conference (WOC), Anne Brown (UK), New Wine, along with others from countries around the world including Austria, Australia, Germany, Netherlands, Japan and other countries.

Contact:
 
Jos Rickman:
housetop@btconnect.com tel +44 1923 779446
Therese Koturbash:
shaburtok@yahoo.ca tel +1 204 622 7002
Website:
http://www.womendeacons.org/
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Ordained Women Deacons 2008/12/31 19:41:44 (permalink)
Deacon St. Melania
Feastday:December 31
439


St. Melania of Rome

St. Melania whose feast day is December 31 was born to wealthy Christians, Publicola, a Roman senator, and Albina. At fourteen, she was married. She had two children who died at an early age. Her husband agreed to lead a life of continency and religious dedication.

Inheriting her father's vast wealth, Melania endowed monasteries in Egypt, Syria, and Palestine and aided churches and monasteries in Europe. To escape the barbarian invasions, she fled with her mother and husband to Tagaste in Numidia in the year 410.

In 417, all three made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land and settled at Jerusalem, where Melania became a friend of St. Jerome. After the death of her mother in 431 and her husband in 432, Melania attracted many women to her way of life, some of whom, like herself, became deacons.

She founded a convent, for which she served as Abbess until her death on December 31, 439.

Her feast day is December 31.
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Ordained Women Deacons 2008/12/31 19:44:25 (permalink)
From a book review of Encountering Women of Faith, The St. Catherine’s Vision Collection, Volume I , Edited by Kyriaki Karidoyanes FitzGerald, 137 pp. InterOrthodox Press $14.95
 
Excerpt from Book Review by Marilyn Rouvelas:

Author Kryiaki Kariodoyanes Fitzgerald, a therapist, focused on the “unspeakable pain and loss” that St. Melania the Younger (383-439) experienced early in her life after the death of her only two children. (The saint was the granddaughter of the well-known St. Melania the Elder.) Although inspired by her grandmother to devote totally herself to the Church, she married and had two children. After losing both their son and daughter, St. Melania turned to intense prayer, study, and fasting. From the author’s personal and professional experience, she expresses intense empathy for St. Melania: “Great losses challenge every aspect of our relationship with reality: God, others, ourselves and creation. . . This is where the unimaginable hole in [St. Melania’s] heart, the hole that seemed to have even replaced her heart, even her very self at times was presented to God as a kind of living sacrifice. This is where her work truly began...” 
 
St. Melania and her husband, St. Pinianus, then became celibate, devoting their lives to the Church. The author poignantly imparts the universality of pain a mother feels at the loss of a child, and suggests turning to the reality of abiding in God’s love, like St. Melania, to bring healing and spiritual growth.

...

The other essays about St. Susanna of Palestine, the Righteous Susanna of the Book of Daniel, the New Martyr Elizabeth Feodorovna, St. Mary Magdalene, St. Catherine, the Myrrh-Bearing Women and a second chapter on St. Melania also help us encounter the saints and our faith in wonderful ways.
 
But the book also gives a broad perspective on the ways women have served in the Orthodox Church in the past and today. By making these women saints, the Church recognized their extraordinary witness and contributions: philanthropy, education, ministering to the needy, founding monasteries, etc. The Church recognized the service of three of these eight women by ordaining them to the diaconate during their lifetimes: St. Olympias, St. Susanna of Palestine, and St. Melania the Younger.
 
As explained in Zahirsky’s chapter on Deaconess Olympias, deaconesses have served in the Orthodox church for centuries. In fact ordination prayers and the rite itself still exist and have not been expunged by the Orthodox Church. (For more information read: Women Deacons in the Orthodox Church by Kyriaki Karidoyanes FitzGerald. The book includes an appendix that provides the Greek ordination rite for the femaledeacon and the recommendations of church consultations at the highest levels starting in 1988 that have advocated the restoration of the order of women deacons.) The female diaconate is now being reinstituted in Greece in a limited way.
Sophie
Moderator
  • Total Posts : 14275
  • Reward points : 0
  • Joined: 2007/01/18 01:57:27
  • Status: offline
RE: Ordained Women Deacons 2008/12/31 20:24:29 (permalink)
Melania the Younger, Woman Deacon and Pinian
Feastday December 31

Born in Rome, Italy, c. 383; died in Jerusalem, December 31, 438 (or 439). Melania was the product of several pious generations of the patrician Roman family of the Valerii. Her grandmother, Saint Antonia Melania the Elder, widow of Valerius Maximus, was one of the first Roman matrons to make a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. When Melania the Elder moved to Egypt in 372 and then to Palestine to become a nun, she left behind her in Rome her six-year-old son Valerius Publicola, who fathered today's saint and was a Roman senator.
 
Antonia Melania the Younger began her life in the splendor of the Valerian palace. She inherited a fantastic fortune--estates in what are now eight modern countries. She controlled whole populations. Yet Melania chose asceticism, which, according to Saint Jerome was inherited from her mother. Her life made contact with several other saints, Saint Paulinus of Nola, Augustine of Hippo, and Jerome--all of whom had a very high opinion of her and her husband.
 
At age 13, Melania married her 17-year-old cousin Saint Valerius Pinianus against her will. She suggested that they live together in celibacy, in exchange for which he could have her entire fortune. He insisted that they have two sons first. They had a daughter they vowed to virginity, then a son. Both of whom died soon after birth. Melania seemed to be dying, too, and made her recovery contingent upon a life of abstinence. Pinianus agreed and she recovered.
 
Their religious devotion and austere lifestyle provoked opposition from other family members. But after her father's death, her widowed mother, Albina, the Christian daughter of a pagan priest, was also won over. The couple then lived in simplicity as far as was possible. They struggled to give away all their property--her annual income was the equivalent of about US$20 million today. When they tried to sell their property for the good of the poor and the Church, their family appealed to Emperor Honorius, who sided with Melania. She became one of the greatest religious philanthropists of all time: She endowed monasteries in Egypt, Syria, and Palestine; helped churches and monasteries in Europe; aided the poor, sick, captives, and pilgrims.
 
Not only did they provide charity out of their surplus, Melania and Pinianus gave of themselves. They freed their 8,000 slaves in two years, but the slaves refused to be freed, so they transferred themselves to Pinianus's brother. By the time Melania was 20, Pinianus, Albina, and Melania left Rome and turned their country estate into a religious center. Their palace became a home for innumerable sick, prisoners, and exiles whom the couple personally sought out.
 
When the Visigoths invaded Rome in 408, Pinianus and Melania moved to Messina, Sicily. In 410, Rome was taken and their palace burned. Finding Sicily in danger, they decided to cross the Mediterranean to Carthage with the aged priest Rufinus. They were shipwrecked on the island of Lipari, which Melania ransomed from pirates. Finally, they moved to their estate in Tagaste, Numidia, in northern Africa. The saintliness of the couple quickly became apparent to the denizens. The citizens of nearby Hippo demanded that Saint Augustine ordain Pinianus at once. Augustine compromised by saying that he should stay in Hippo for a time as a layman. The couple also established a monastery and a convent, where she lived in great austerity.
 
By 417, most of their estates were sold and the couple was truly poor. Melania, Pinianus, and Albina made a pilgrimage to Palestine, then visited the desert monks in Egypt, and finally settled in Jerusalem, where Melania's grandmother Antonia Melania had been living as a nun. Melania's cousin, Saint Paula, introduced her to the group of Roman women in Bethlehem presided over by Saint Jerome, whose friend she became.
 
After her mother Albina's death in 431, Melania established herself as a recluse. She founded a monastery and sent her husband to seek out those with vocations. He succeeded, then died in 432, and was buried on Mount Olivet near her mother. Melania lived in a room near his tomb for four years until she attracted numerous disciples. Then she founded and directed a convent to care for the Church of the Ascension and sing the Divine Office continually for her mother and husband. She shared in their life of prayer and good works, and occupied herself with copying books.
 
Her uncle Volusianus wrote to her insinuating that she should consider marriage to Emperor Valentinian III. She went to Constantinople, ingratiated herself with the imperial family, then undertook a brisk campaign against the Nestorian heresy, and fell ill. She converted her uncle and assisted him to a holy death on January 6, 437.
 
Melania went to Bethlehem for her last Christmas and spent it with Saint Paula. She returned to her convent for the feast of Saint Stephen and died five days later, with Saint Paula, the monks, nuns, and the bishop present. As she was dying Paula began crying and Melania consoled her.
 
Melania's biography was written by her chaplain, Gerontius. Although Melania has been venerated in the Eastern Church for centuries, she has had no cultus in the West. Pope Pius X, however, approved the observance of her feast in 1908 for the Somaschi, an observance followed by the Latin Catholics of Constantinople and Jerusalem (Attwater, Benedictines, Delaney, Encyclopedia, Martindale).
Page: < 12345 Showing page 5 of 5 - Powered by APG vNext Trial
Guest
Quick Reply: (Open Full Version)
  Enter the random characters shown
Submit Post
Jump to:
© 2020 APG vNext Trial Version 4.6

This website is maintained by the Wijngaards Institute for Catholic Research.

Wijngaards Institute for Catholic Research

Visitors to www.womenpriests.org since 11 January 2014

Wijngaards Institute for Catholic Research